`Elite' Schools in US and Japan? Each System Is Selective, but Both Have a High Percentage of Students in College Series: WORLD MEDIA EDUCATION. Part 3. in the Last of 3 Special Reports, Writers for the World Media Newspaper Network Peer into the Future of Education, Especially the Effects of Computers, and They Contrast the Ways in Which Two World Leaders - the US and Japan - Have Structured Their Systems of Learning. the Preceding Parts Appeared Sept. 8 and Sept. 15 (World Edition, Sept. 10-16 and Sept. 17-23). Fifth of 5 Articles Appearing Today

By Harold W. Stevenson and James W. Stigler. Harold W. Stevenson teaches teaches . | The Christian Science Monitor, September 22, 1993 | Go to article overview

`Elite' Schools in US and Japan? Each System Is Selective, but Both Have a High Percentage of Students in College Series: WORLD MEDIA EDUCATION. Part 3. in the Last of 3 Special Reports, Writers for the World Media Newspaper Network Peer into the Future of Education, Especially the Effects of Computers, and They Contrast the Ways in Which Two World Leaders - the US and Japan - Have Structured Their Systems of Learning. the Preceding Parts Appeared Sept. 8 and Sept. 15 (World Edition, Sept. 10-16 and Sept. 17-23). Fifth of 5 Articles Appearing Today


Harold W. Stevenson and James W. Stigler. Harold W. Stevenson teaches teaches ., The Christian Science Monitor


IT is sometimes said that the Japanese and American educational systems are elitist, effectively serving only a small percentage of their populations.

In Japan, the charge focuses on university entrance examinations and the intense competition that exists for admission to the most prestigious schools.

Criticism of the United States more frequently deals with the neglect of poor children and the plight of minority students.

All educational systems are elitist in that they are hierarchically organized. What differs is the point at which selections are made for each level of the hierarchy. Japanese students are not classified until junior high school. In the US, classification may start in kindergarten.

The Japanese population has become one of the most highly educated of any country. Only in higher education does the system falter. Japanese colleges and universities appear to function in many ways as waiting stations, where students spend four relatively unproductive years, biding their time until they join a company and receive the training necessary for them to function successfully in their jobs.

What about the United States, which has invested heavily in colleges and universities to create a system of higher education whose excellence attracts students from all over the world? As in Japan, one aspect of American education is seriously marred: The typical American elementary or high school student consistently receives scores below the average of peers in developed nations.

Yet despite the fact that approximately 14 percent of US students - compared with around 4 percent in Japan - drop out of high school, 62 percent of white high school graduates went directly from high school to college in 1989. Even minority students entered colleges at a high rate: 48 percent of African Americans and 53 percent of Hispanic Americans.

The reputed elitism of the Japanese and American educational systems is based partly on stereotype and myth. In both countries, the percentages of students who enroll in some type of secondary education are among the world's highest.

Even in Japan, known for the severity of the competitiveness among students for college entrance, 32 percent of high school graduates enroll in some form of higher education and another 30 percent receive vocational education beyond that obtained in high school.

The Japanese Ministry of Education goes to great lengths to provide all elementary-school students with equal opportunities. All schools follow a national curriculum. An effort to equalize opportunity is also evident in the lack of tracking or ability grouping in Japanese elementary schools. Special classes for gifted students do not exist: They would be regarded as displaying unfair favoritism, thus violating the egalitarian philosophy on which the elementary-education system is built. Teaching in Japan is directed at the whole class, with little small-group instruction. …

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`Elite' Schools in US and Japan? Each System Is Selective, but Both Have a High Percentage of Students in College Series: WORLD MEDIA EDUCATION. Part 3. in the Last of 3 Special Reports, Writers for the World Media Newspaper Network Peer into the Future of Education, Especially the Effects of Computers, and They Contrast the Ways in Which Two World Leaders - the US and Japan - Have Structured Their Systems of Learning. the Preceding Parts Appeared Sept. 8 and Sept. 15 (World Edition, Sept. 10-16 and Sept. 17-23). Fifth of 5 Articles Appearing Today
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