It's High Time to Embrace Havana

By Walter C. Clemens Jr. . Walter C. Clemens Jr. teaches " will be published W. H. Freeman & Co. | The Christian Science Monitor, October 21, 1993 | Go to article overview

It's High Time to Embrace Havana


Walter C. Clemens Jr. . Walter C. Clemens Jr. teaches " will be published W. H. Freeman & Co., The Christian Science Monitor


HAVANA has signaled that it is ready and willing to cooperate with Washington, and that it would welcome American investors. It's high time for the United States to reconcile with Cuba - even if Fidel Castro Ruz is still "maximum leader" there. Americans have neither a power motive nor a moral right to continue a hard line toward Cuba. Indeed, there are material and moral reasons why the Clinton administration should hang up the gloves and stretch out its hand.

So long as Cuba was the base for communizing the Americas and a Soviet spearhead in Africa, Washington had reason to put a strangle hold on Mr. Castro. Cuba no longer threatens the Americas, and its leader intimidates no one when he shows up at inter-American conferences wearing his military garb.

It is only a question of time before Castro is out. There is no point in squeezing the Cuban public to pressure Fidel to leave. No one must prove the failure of centralized economies.

How bad are things in Cuba? It is not so terrible that bikes are replacing aged autos, but fuel for all purposes is in short supply. Food intake is down. Healthy living is more difficult. Do Americans have any reason to want ordinary Cubans to suffer?

The communist system makes life harder. A young couple living in Puerto Rico went back to Cuba to visit their parents and found a gaping hole in their apartment roof. They couldn't obtain materials to plug the hole. No state enterprise would do the job. The situation is worse than in the old USSR where bribes procured both materials and repairmen. Informers and police agents are thicker in Cuba than in the USSR. Cuban authorities punish what Soviets winked at.

But can Washington expect that squeezing Castro more will compel him to give up police controls? It is more likely that repression will intensify so long as he feels pressured.

AMERICANS owe Cubans something. Since 1898 US policies toward Cuba have tended to be paternalistic, exploitative, and counterproductive - for Cubans and for the US. Washington imposed the Platt Amendment on the Cuban constitution, giving the US the right to interfere in Cuban affairs; it demanded Guantanamo for a US naval base; it sent in US forces intermittently to establish order. …

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