Clinton Delves Deeply into the Crime Issue President's Approach Balances Prevention and Punishment, but Policy Still Doesn't Match His `New Democrat' Rhetoric

By Marshall Ingwerson, writer of The Christian Science Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, November 23, 1993 | Go to article overview
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Clinton Delves Deeply into the Crime Issue President's Approach Balances Prevention and Punishment, but Policy Still Doesn't Match His `New Democrat' Rhetoric


Marshall Ingwerson, writer of The Christian Science Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


THE crime bill nearing passage on Capitol Hill would put 100,000 more police officers on the streets, stiffen sentences, ban some assault weapons, and impose a five-day waiting period on handgun purchases.

President Clinton supports these steps. But the president's own public ruminations on the crime issue go much further, take in much more of the social disorder in American cities, and appear to contain some of his most heartfelt and eloquent concerns.

He takes the crime conversation to root causes, including lack of jobs, but he also raises subjects that liberal Democrats once did not permit each other to raise - especially the crisis of family and values in the black community.

His concerns are not yet matched by a program to do something about it. But he says that key members of his Cabinet are working on a set of proposals, to emerge in coming weeks, designed to mount an assault on violence and to support family and community structures in areas where the problems are concentrated. The Memphis speech

In one of his more acclaimed speeches, Mr. Clinton told a group of black ministers in Memphis on Nov. 13: "Unless we deal with the ravages of crime and drugs and violence, and unless we recognize that it's due to the breakdown of the family, the community, and the disappearance of jobs, and unless we say some of this cannot be done by government because we have to reach deep inside to the values, the spirit, the soul, and the truth of human nature, none of the other things we seek to do will ever take us where we need to go."

Clinton's discussion of the root causes of crime differs from the ideas held by liberals a generation ago, because Clinton points not just to causes lodged outside the black community but also to problems among blacks. "This is a `New Democrat' combination of personal responsibility and social responsibility," says Sheldon Danziger, a sociologist at the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor.

Clinton's recent remarks on crime, Dr. Danziger says, represent "a very thoughtful, balanced analysis of the academic research on urban poverty.

"These are consensus views these days," he adds, "of a thoughtful spectrum that runs from left of the mainstream to right of the mainstream."

"It's a sophisticated view that is a delight to see coming from a president," says Al Blumstein, a criminologist at Carnegie-Mellon University in Pittsburgh.

But it is also a sophistication unmatched by much clear thinking in Washington about action, notes Francis Hartmann, director of criminal justice policy at Harvard's Kennedy School of Government.

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