Women's Suffrage in a Graphic Display

By Elizabeth Levitan Spaid, writer of The Christian Science Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, November 24, 1993 | Go to article overview
Save to active project

Women's Suffrage in a Graphic Display


Elizabeth Levitan Spaid, writer of The Christian Science Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


IN convention halls, union rooms, and on streets of the United States and Great Britain from the 1850s to the early 20th century, a chorus of women's voices grew louder.

The women were suffragists protesting laws that forbade them the right to vote.

The suffragist movement began in Britain in 1851 and in America in 1869. Women used a variety of tactics to get their message out. For years they lobbied politicians, spoke to audiences of men, picketed, and demonstrated. In England, where the movement was most militant, many women participated in hunger strikes, broke windows, and were imprisoned. Later they used posters to promote their cause.

A collection of 55 posters - rare reprints and one-of-a-kind originals - are on display at Radcliffe College's Schlesinger Library on the History of Women in America in Cambridge, Mass., through Dec. 3. The exhibit, "Votes for Women," celebrates the 50th anniversary of the library, which started in 1943 with a collection of suffrage materials.

Many posters in the collection, which belonged to California suffragist Alice Park, were produced by both female and male artists who worked for pro-women causes.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited article

Women's Suffrage in a Graphic Display
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?