Britain's Detention of Visiting Jamaicans Spurs Racism Charges London Officials Refuse to Explain Reasons for Interrogation but Say Drugs Were Not a Factor

By Alexander MacLeod, Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, December 29, 1993 | Go to article overview

Britain's Detention of Visiting Jamaicans Spurs Racism Charges London Officials Refuse to Explain Reasons for Interrogation but Say Drugs Were Not a Factor


Alexander MacLeod, Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


THE British government is having to defend itself against charges that it is adopting a racist approach to immigration control.

It is also embroiled in a diplomatic row with Jamaica over the allegedly unfair treatment by immigration officials of Caribbean citizens attempting to visit Britain during the Christmas holiday.

The dispute broke out after 190 of 323 passengers on a chartered jet from Kingston, Jamaica, were placed in detention by Home Office officials at London's Gatwick Airport on Dec. 22.

After 48 hours of close questioning, 56 of the Jamaicans were denied entry to Britain. Twenty-seven of them were sent back to Kingston after being told that they would never be allowed to enter Britain. Others returned home voluntarily. About 100 of the 190 originally detained were granted temporary admission.

Police and immigration officials refused requests by journalists and photographers to cover the deportation of the 27 Jamaicans and declined to explain why they had been sent home.

In taking such tough and unusual action, the immigration authorities were touching a raw nerve in British society. There are up to 1.5 million non-white citizens living in Britain, and a high proportion of them are of Caribbean origin.

The widespread public perception in Britain is that Jamaicans are active in gangs connected with the narcotics trade. Home Office spokesmen say this was not a factor in the airport detentions.

All of the would-be visitors at Gatwick told officials they had arrived for short-term stays, and most claimed to be visiting relatives. More than 500 Jamaican friends and relatives were kept waiting at the airport while the detentions continued. Court challenge

Claude Moraes, director of the Joint Council for the Welfare of Immigrants, describes the British authorities' action as "a disgrace" and "a total humiliation for black people." He says his organization plans to challenge the action in court.

Mr. Moraes worries that Britain may soon begin demanding visas from Caribbean citizens wishing to enter Britain. Such visas are not required under current law.

Bill Morris, Jamaican-born general secretary of the Transport and General Workers' Union, the country's largest, has written to Prime Minister John Major, demanding an explanation for the treatment of the visitors on the pre-Christmas flight.

In a complaint to London, the Jamaican government reminded Foreign Secretary Douglas Hurd that 32,000 Jamaicans visit Britain each year and demanded to know whether there had been any change in the entry criteria being applied. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Britain's Detention of Visiting Jamaicans Spurs Racism Charges London Officials Refuse to Explain Reasons for Interrogation but Say Drugs Were Not a Factor
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.