Major's `Back to Basics' Runs Afoul of Scandal the Emphasis on British Domestic Policy Has Failed to Unite Tories

By Alexander MacLeod, Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, January 18, 1994 | Go to article overview

Major's `Back to Basics' Runs Afoul of Scandal the Emphasis on British Domestic Policy Has Failed to Unite Tories


Alexander MacLeod, Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


PRIME Minister John Major's government is in acute disarray after nearly a month of political scandals, Cabinet infighting, and claims that Britain's leader has lost credibility.

There is open talk among Conservative Party supporters in London and the English countryside of an early leadership challenge to Mr. Major if he does not speedily reassert his authority.

At the heart of the crisis is bitter disagreement among Tories about Major's "back-to-basics" policy centering on family values and ethics in government. This clean image has come under fire in past weeks as two government ministers were forced to resign amid charges of sexual impropriety.

On Jan. 16, the man who took over from Margaret (now Lady) Thatcher in December 1990 became embroiled in a public argument with two mass-circulation newspapers that normally support Conservative governments.

The Daily Mail and the Sun both reported that at a private dinner party Major had sworn to "crucify" three right-wing Cabinet ministers who, he is said to have claimed, had tried to hijack the back-to-basics policy for their own ideological ends.

Officials at 10 Downing Street, the prime minister's London residence, denied the reports and accused the two papers and other sections of the media of attempting to "wage a campaign to destabilize the government" and "precipitate a general election."

Major launched the back-to-basics policy last October in an attempt to heal Conservative Party wounds opened up by a long-running dispute about the Maastricht Treaty on European Union.

The prime minister tried to put the focus on family cohesion, better education, law and order, effective health care, and more accountable government.

But three senior Cabinet members decided to interpret the policy narrowly, arguing for greater personal morality and complaining that too much government money was being spent to support unmarried mothers. This reopened the wounds, and Major's failure to end the resulting squabbling has led to charges that he is weak and indecisive.

The back-to-basics policy became a topic of fervent public debate early in January when one government minister was forced to resign after disclosures that he had fathered a child outside marriage, and another quit the government when his wife committed suicide. It has since been widely reported that before his wife's death the minister had been having an affair with another woman.

Major attempted to quell the resulting public uproar by arguing that the back-to-basics policy did not have much to do with "silly indiscretions" by ministers. Within a day or two, Conservative members of Parliament began getting huge numbers of letters from voters arguing that private morality and the behavior of elected officials are linked.

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