Latin America's Path of Economic Reform as Leadership Changes Hands in the Majority of Republics, Economic Gains Should Be Expanded Rather Than Reversed

By Peter Hakim. Peter Hakim is president of the Inter-American Dialogue . | The Christian Science Monitor, February 24, 1994 | Go to article overview

Latin America's Path of Economic Reform as Leadership Changes Hands in the Majority of Republics, Economic Gains Should Be Expanded Rather Than Reversed


Peter Hakim. Peter Hakim is president of the Inter-American Dialogue ., The Christian Science Monitor


DURING this year and next, new presidents are scheduled to take office in 14 of the 20 Latin American republics. The last such large-scale transformation of leadership in the region occurred in 1989 and 1990, a time when most of Latin America was still mired in a protracted crisis of debt and lack of growth.

Although difficult to predict, this kind of sweeping political change will almost surely have important consequences for the region and for its relations with the rest of the world. The implications for economic policy have been the main focus of attention.

Will the new leaders sustain the dramatic economic reforms - emphasizing fiscal discipline, private markets, and export growth - adopted by most Latin American countries in recent years? Or are governments likely to revert to more traditional policy approaches? This question is of some significance for the United States, now that its free-trade agreement with Mexico has gone into force and the Clinton administration is proposing to build similar economic partnerships with other nations of the region.

Latin America's two most recent presidential elections - in Venezuela in December and Costa Rica earlier this month - brought to power vocal critics of the so-called neo-liberal economic reforms, both of whom campaigned on promises to slow the pace of reform and even to reverse some aspects of it.

Particularly when coupled with the New Year's Day uprising in Chiapas, Mexico, the violent protests in Argentina's Santiago del Estero province, and the intense congressional resistance to economic reform in Brazil and Uruguay, these election results might suggest that reform is becoming more unpopular and difficult to maintain in Latin America.

That conclusion is not yet warranted, however. Venezuelan voters may not all be enthusiastic about recent economic changes, but in voting for former President Rafael Caldera Rodriguez, it was mainly political corruption, incompetence, and paralysis they were rejecting. For their part, the Costa Ricans again chose to switch parties, as they tend to do every four years, within their highly consensual system. The economic policies of Venezuela or Costa Rica are unlikely to change very much because of the elections. And presidential elections in the past year in Chile and Bolivia put strong market advocates into office. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Latin America's Path of Economic Reform as Leadership Changes Hands in the Majority of Republics, Economic Gains Should Be Expanded Rather Than Reversed
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.