Rightists Lead in Salvadoran Vote Early Results Point to a Runoff; Leftist Party Leaders Allege Official Ballot Fraud. FIRST ELECTIONS SINCE CIVIL WAR

By David Clark Scott, writer of The Christian Science Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, March 22, 1994 | Go to article overview

Rightists Lead in Salvadoran Vote Early Results Point to a Runoff; Leftist Party Leaders Allege Official Ballot Fraud. FIRST ELECTIONS SINCE CIVIL WAR


David Clark Scott, writer of The Christian Science Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


ROUND ONE in El Salvador's presidential elections on Sunday went to the ruling conservative party.

But the failure of the Nationalist Republican Alliance (ARENA) to vanquish a leftist coalition in the first elections since the end of a bloody 12-year civil war will send Salvadorans back to the polls for a runoff next month.

With 63 percent of the vote counted, preliminary results show ARENA coming up just short of the 51 percent of the vote needed to win the presidency outright. The three-party leftist coalition, which includes the former guerrilla group, Farabundo Marti National Liberation Front (FMLN), is in second place with 27 percent. The center-left Christian Democratic Party, which ruled from 1984-88, is in third with about 15 percent of the vote.

The FMLN and its allies angrily accused the Supreme Electoral Tribunal, the government agency managing the elections, of permitting "massive" fraud.

"Conservatively, more than 10 percent of the voters couldn't vote simply because of errors {in the voter roll} by the Supreme Electoral Tribunal," says Ruben Zamora, the leftist coalition presidential candidate. "This has to be corrected in the second round."

Anomalies witnessed by journalists and about 3,000 foreign observers included voters whose names should have been registered but were not; people told that others had voted using their names; and voters told that their credentials were invalid.

In all, FMLN officials claimed about 300,000 of the 2.7 million eligible voters were unable to vote. They blamed the lower-than-expected voter turnout (about 45 percent abstention) on foul-ups by the electoral agency. The FMLN also claimed a United Nations mission representative and a coalition party electoral technician were illegally expelled from the electoral computer center.

UN officials downplayed the election "irregularities" as typical bureaucratic mixups that would not affect the election's outcome. In addition to the presidency, Salvadorans voted on the entire national legislature - 82 members - and all 262 municipal councils.

Preliminary results show ARENA winning the mayoralty of San Salvador. But it appears the FMLN will win some mayoralties outside the capital and a strong voice in the legislature.

In coming days, the two leading parties will court the six other parties who participated in the election. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Rightists Lead in Salvadoran Vote Early Results Point to a Runoff; Leftist Party Leaders Allege Official Ballot Fraud. FIRST ELECTIONS SINCE CIVIL WAR
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.