Reform Critics Band in Russian Parliament to Counter Yeltsin Opposition Leaders Call It a `Movement of Reconciliation'; Critics See a Pretext for Uniting Nationalists, Communists

By Wendy Sloane, | The Christian Science Monitor, March 31, 1994 | Go to article overview

Reform Critics Band in Russian Parliament to Counter Yeltsin Opposition Leaders Call It a `Movement of Reconciliation'; Critics See a Pretext for Uniting Nationalists, Communists


Wendy Sloane,, The Christian Science Monitor


EARLIER this month, Valery Zorkin, the former head of Russia's suspended Constitutional Court, found a new hobby.

A soft-spoken man inclined toward outbursts of indignation, Mr. Zorkin has not been too busy since the court was suspended in October following the bloody uprising against President Boris Yeltsin. So he was delighted to be included among a band of Mr. Yeltsin's enemies who initiated the "Accord for Russia" movement, a retaliation against the domestic peace pact envisioned by the president to reconcile the forces splitting the country.

The movement, conceived after Yeltsin left Moscow for a two-week vacation in the Black Sea resort of Sochi confident that he was leaving behind a "calm" atmosphere, represents what its members call the "patriotic opposition." They advocate preserving the industrial-military complex, restoring the power of the state, putting an end to crime and corruption, and turning back Yeltsin's market reforms.

It calls itself a movement of reconciliation. But its critics see it as a pretext for uniting prominent nationalists with communists, and some members admit that its conception is simply a step toward all-out war against a politically weakened Yeltsin.

"When someone says that our association unites the Communists with the Nazis, it's a crude falsification," says Zorkin, who retained a seat on the 13-member court after he was fired as chairman and still keeps an office in the imposing courthouse in central Moscow. "We are uniting a broad spectrum of people. We call ourselves left-centrists."

In a letter circulated March 16 in the State Duma, or lower house of parliament, the 19 original initiators of the Accord exhorted "all patriotic forces and movements, ideologies and beliefs that reject violence, racism, and nationalism" to join together and "prevent the final collapse of historic Russia."

The diverse supporters include individuals who until recently would not have joined forces, such as former Vice President Alexander Rutskoi, and Sergei Glazyev, Yeltsin's trade minister until last year. Mr. Rutskoi was recently released from prison where he was sent for inciting riots during the October uprising in which 147 people were killed.

Others include Communist Party chief Gennady Zyuganov; radical nationalist Sergei Baburin; and Sergei Prokhanov, the editor of Zaftra, an anti-Semitic weekly.

No reformist groups represented in the State Duma have joined the Accord, and the only major opposition leader who refused to sign up was Vladimir Zhirinovsky, the ultranationalist Liberal Democratic Party head.

"We did not invite Zhirinovsky, nor did we personally discuss our movement with him, but it is open to everyone," says Mr. Zyuganov, who says 150 members of the 444-seat Duma support the Accord and at least half eventually will join. "The salvation of the country lies in the single union of the popular national patriotic forces."

"I always said that the Communists are much more dangerous than Zhirinovsky," says former Finance Minister Boris Fyodorov, who resigned from the Russian government in January along with other key reformers such as Yegor Gaidar. "It's obvious that these guys are getting organized, they're very serious, and they're not hysterical. That's the biggest danger." Blaming Yeltsin

Zyuganov and other members of the Accord hold Yeltsin personally responsible for what the Communist leader calls the "deep crisis" in the country, beginning with the destruction of the Soviet Union, followed by a widening gap between rich and poor combined with "kow-towing" to the West in return for aid, and climaxed by the October events. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Reform Critics Band in Russian Parliament to Counter Yeltsin Opposition Leaders Call It a `Movement of Reconciliation'; Critics See a Pretext for Uniting Nationalists, Communists
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.