One-Stop Help for Urban Children, Parents A Number of States Are Creating `Child Opportunity Zones,' Which Are Central Places for Inner-City Children and Their Parents to Receive Such Services as Literacy Training, Health Care, Day Care

By David Holmstrom, writer of The Christian Science Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, April 11, 1994 | Go to article overview

One-Stop Help for Urban Children, Parents A Number of States Are Creating `Child Opportunity Zones,' Which Are Central Places for Inner-City Children and Their Parents to Receive Such Services as Literacy Training, Health Care, Day Care


David Holmstrom, writer of The Christian Science Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


AT William D'Abate Elementary School in Providence, look past the graffiti scrawled on the low, gray building. Look past the full-time guard in the parking lot. Put on hold the notion that the surrounding low-income, urban neighborhood is too overloaded with numbing social problems to fight back.

In reality, this school fought back to become a "child opportunity zone," a place where public education is shaped by a key precept: Optimal learning takes place when the related needs of children and parents, including social, education, and health services, are addressed together.

Rhode Island and other states, including Kentucky and Minnesota, are now committed to creating child-opportunity zones in many schools districts, with each school defining its own approach. Educators in Rhode Island call these zones the "wave of the future" for inner-city schools.

"Educational research has shown that children don't learn well if they and their families are in need of the most basic services," says Phil Zarlengo, director of integrated social services for elementary and secondary schools at the Rhode Island Department of Education.

"The focus now has to be on starting early with children, along with intervention programs," says Joseph Renzulli, assistant superintendent for elementary education in Providence public schools, "and trying to avoid continual remediation programs later on. And the key is to work with the parents and children simultaneously."

The "zone" concept takes an ideal form when a school like William D'Abate pools social, education, and health services under one roof by renovating and using a large, abandoned recreation hall connected to the school. An empty swimming pool will also be used again.

Advocates call the zone concept a "one-stop shopping" service to enable low-income parents to avoid the time-consuming effort of riding buses to visit social agencies in different places.

When Bernice Graser became principal at William D'Abate six years ago, she became the spark plug who created a decisionmaking team that pulled parents and volunteers into the school by meeting community needs in such areas as health care, adult education, literacy, family counseling, nutrition, day care, tutoring, and substance-abuse prevention.

"I remember going to the school for activity nights several years ago," Mr. Renzulli says, "and there might have been 10 or 15 parents. Now 200 or 300 parents will attend an activity." Community consensus

Even before funds were approved recently for child-opportunity zones in 20 Providence schools, Mrs. Graser and her school-management team, using a $300,000 federal grant, were changing William D'Abate by including parents and children in decisions. "We have 35 countries represented here," she says, "and when we asked the students what they wanted to have the most, the answer was a museum."

Items in the museum include clothing, art, books, and music from the countries of the children's ethnic roots. …

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