`Green' Lumber Ties Forest Products, Environmentalists

By Robert Bryce, | The Christian Science Monitor, April 12, 1994 | Go to article overview

`Green' Lumber Ties Forest Products, Environmentalists


Robert Bryce,, The Christian Science Monitor


DOZENS of sawmills are closed, the US Forest Service has slashed timber sales, and thousands of loggers have been put out of work. But the Clinton administration's new timber policy has created a growth industry: certifiers of "green" lumber.

Over the past four years, nearly a dozen groups have launched programs to certify timber companies that produce lumber in a "sustainable" manner.

Some call it "stewardship forestry," a few industry members prefer "well-managed forestry," others like "long-term forestry." Whatever the moniker, analysts believe the move toward "green" certification and marketing of "green" lumber is accelerating.

"It's changing the face of the forest industry," says Richard Miller, executive director of The Forest Partnership, a Vermont-based nonprofit group which distributes green wood and tracks certifiers.

Although the programs include only one-half of one percent of the timber industry, Mr. Miller nevertheless calls the certification programs "the most revolutionary change in the forest industry in its history. This is the bridge between the environmental community and the forest products industry."

One of the oldest certification programs, run by the Rainforest Alliance, is called Smart Wood. Begun in 1991, the program has certified logging operations in Indonesia, Mexico, Brazil, and New Guinea. Logging outfits in 20 other countries are now seeking certification, including several in the US. The program also certifies lumber sales outlets and furniture suppliers who carry products under the Smart Wood label.

Forest managers and environmentalists point to Menominee Tribal Enterprises as a top example. One of three domestic timber producers to be certified by Oakland-based Scientific Certification Systems (SCS), the 8,500-member tribe has been harvesting timber from their property since 1850. Last year, they harvested 14 million board feet from their 234,000 acre forest in northeastern Wisconsin. …

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