Air-Polluting Tale of Two Cities Juarez and El Paso Won't Breathe Easy until Plants in Juarez, Operating under Less-Strict Mexican Environmental Law, Are Cleaned Up

By Robert Bryce, | The Christian Science Monitor, May 25, 1994 | Go to article overview
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Air-Polluting Tale of Two Cities Juarez and El Paso Won't Breathe Easy until Plants in Juarez, Operating under Less-Strict Mexican Environmental Law, Are Cleaned Up


Robert Bryce,, The Christian Science Monitor


THE El Paso metropolitan area has some of the worst air quality in North America. Much of the pollution in the region comes from Ciudad Juarez, El Paso's burgeoning industrial neighbor across the Rio Grande. And although El Paso has spent millions of dollars to comply with federal clean air regulations, local officials have found that the two cities must work together to effectively address the problem.

Last week, local, state, and federal officials from the United States and Mexico met again in Juarez to negotiate the details of an international air quality management district that will monitor emissions and air quality and administer technology transfers to improve air quality in both cities.

One of the largest and fastest growing cities on the US-Mexico border, the El Paso-Juarez metropolitan area has between 1.5 and 2 million residents. "The controls we are currently putting in place only affect El Paso, about 700,000 people," explains Jesus Reynoso, air quality program director for the El Paso City-County Health and Environmental District. "It's not possible to reduce all the pollution if you are only controlling one-third of the population."

Considered a "nonattainment" area under the US Clean Air Act of 1990, El Paso violates US standards for ground-level ozone, carbon monoxide, and particulate matter. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has mandated that the city reduce its hydrocarbon emissions by 15 percent.

Reynoso says that El Paso residents are now using lower-polluting, oxygenated gasoline. Also, city businesses and agencies are converting hundreds of vehicles to clean-burning fuels like natural gas. The city has begun paving alleys to reduce airborne dust and has placed restrictions on wood burning.

In addition, city residents may soon have restricted access to hydrocarbon-releasing consumer products such as floor wax and paint.

Yet Reynoso and others believe more air pollution reductions are possible on the south side of the river, where about 400 brick kilns employ antiquated technology and several hundred maquiladoras (export-oriented border factories) operate under less stringent Mexican pollution laws.

The US Department of Energy (DOE), including the Los Alamos National Laboratory and Sandia National Laboratory, have agreed to collect data and assist businesses in Juarez that want to convert to cleaner technologies.

Using a laser-based system known as lidar (short for light detecting and ranging), Los Alamos will be able to measure air pollution concentrations throughout the region.

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Air-Polluting Tale of Two Cities Juarez and El Paso Won't Breathe Easy until Plants in Juarez, Operating under Less-Strict Mexican Environmental Law, Are Cleaned Up
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