The President's Missing Link Clinton Must Recognize Ties between Foreign, Domestic Policy

By Alan Stoga. Alan Stoga is managing director of Kissinger Associates Consultants, a. geopolitical consulting firm in New York. | The Christian Science Monitor, June 8, 1994 | Go to article overview

The President's Missing Link Clinton Must Recognize Ties between Foreign, Domestic Policy


Alan Stoga. Alan Stoga is managing director of Kissinger Associates Consultants, a. geopolitical consulting firm in New York., The Christian Science Monitor


REMINISCENT of early explorers who believed the earth was flat, President Clinton came into office with the idea that he could concentrate on domestic policy and largely ignore something called foreign policy.

From the earliest days of his campaign, he focused on a well-developed and sharply articulated social and economic strategy for the United States; references to the rest of the world were episodic, brief, and without underlying principles. He organized his government and concentrated first on filling the key "domestic" jobs and giving the appointees an aggressive reform mandate, then belatedly filled out his national security team with officials whose prime task seemed and still seems to be damage limitation. And he has governed with a clear relish for issues like health care and welfare reform and an even clearer distaste for recurrent problems in distant corners of the globe for which the US, the sole superpower, has no answer or appetite.

In the real world, the distinctions underlying the president's world view no longer exist. The globalization of communications and of capital have eroded - if not yet fully erased - the old notion that as a continental-sized country with secure borders, the US was uniquely free to conduct foreign policy removed from and sometimes at odds with its domestic policy. Today, a coup attempt in Russia or an assassination in Mexico rattles investors and drives up US interest rates. Simultaneous trade conflicts with Japan and China, in part over how those two countries choose to govern themselves, endanger billions of dollars in US exports. This, in turn, threatens an untold number of jobs in the US. Weakness and inconsistency on Haiti, observed in Pyongyang, risk war on the Korean peninsula - which would surely terrify the New York stock and bond markets. The interconnections are endless, and endlessly threatening to a country whose president fails to understand them.

Mexico is one of the few countries that has benefited from the Clinton presidency. President Bush proposed and largely negotiated the North American Free Trade Agreement, but Mr. Clinton worked furiously for its passage.

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