The `Gotcha!' Game: Finicky Cases of Law Enforcement

By Gardner, Marilyn | The Christian Science Monitor, October 13, 1994 | Go to article overview

The `Gotcha!' Game: Finicky Cases of Law Enforcement


Gardner, Marilyn, The Christian Science Monitor


ONE of the strangest games of the '90s will never show up on the shelves of Toys * Us. Played by zealous adults, the game, which could be called "Gotcha!," requires no fixed rules. Its only goal is to catch unsuspecting people in largely innocent acts, then declare them guilty of a crime.

The latest round of "Gotcha!" took place in New York last week. Four businessmen, commuting home to Westchester County, settled into their seats on the Metro-North train for a routine activity - their daily poker game. Before the train ever left the station, two police officers appeared, looking for illegal smokers. But after spotting a deck of cards and $141 in cash, they arrested the foursome for gambling. Handcuffed and humiliated, the commuters were led through the terminal, placed in holding cells, and fingerprinted and photographed.

Gotcha!

Never mind that one of the men, a lawyer, had been playing poker on the train for 28 years. And never mind that the railroad itself runs radio commercials saying, "You can have card games on the train." In a society where lotteries and state-sanctioned gambling exist almost everywhere, the only mistake, apparently, is to play cards with friends rather than the state.

The police officers probably thought they were just doing their job. Yet considering the crimes that occur in New York railroad stations - robberies, rapes, even murders - other passengers could be forgiven for wondering: Is arresting smokers and card players the best use of limited police resources?

The incident recalls another interrupted card game more than a decade ago in Largo, Fla. Eight retired men, playing nickel-and-dime poker one afternoon in their mobile home park, were arrested for violating the state's gambling law. Their trial took two days. Although the judge could have sentenced them to six months in jail and fined them $500, he put the men, quickly dubbed the "Largo Eight," on one month probation and ordered them to pay $75 each in court costs. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

The `Gotcha!' Game: Finicky Cases of Law Enforcement
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.