In Securities Industry, the Talk Is of Layoffs WALL STREET WOES

By Guy Halverson, writer of The Christian Science Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, October 2, 1994 | Go to article overview

In Securities Industry, the Talk Is of Layoffs WALL STREET WOES


Guy Halverson, writer of The Christian Science Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


FOR thousands of workers on Wall Street, the threat of the pink slip is in the air.

The General Electric Company's decision to sell most of its scandal-tarnished investment house, Kidder, Peabody & Company to PaineWebber Group Inc., and shed hundreds of jobs in the process, is only one indicator of Wall Street's woes. As it did in the late 1980s, the investment community finds itself in financial difficulty, following several years of soaring profits.

Wall Street's current slower growth in sales and profits runs counter to most United States industries. Nationally, factories are humming, exports are up, and many unemployed workers are finding new jobs. But within the securities industry, the talk is of layoffs and the possibility of more mergers as firms scramble to maintain profit margins.

On Tuesday, Merrill Lynch & Company reported a 36 percent drop in earnings for the latest quarter, and Bear Stearns & Company said profits fell 66 percent.

"When revenues are flat or turned down, as now, that creates a very difficult competitive environment," says Perrin Long Jr., a Detroit-based independent analyst who has covered the financial industry for several decades.

"It is not inconceivable that upwards of 6,000 employees on Wall Street could be let go by next spring," he adds.

On Oct. 17, GE announced that it would sell most of its Kidder subsidiary to investment house PaineWebber in a stock transaction valued at around $670 million.

The deal follows allegations earlier this year that a Kidder bond trader, either acting alone or in concert with others, engaged in bogus trades that made the investment firm look more profitable than it was.

"The fact that GE made no effort to get Kidder's balance sheet in better shape before Kidder was sold, thus boosting the potential sales value of Kidder, showed that {GE chairman} Jack Welch was saying, `Let's get rid of this thing,' " Mr. Long says. "The big question now is how well PaineWebber will be able to absorb Kidder's staff and operations."

Perhaps as many as one-half of Kidder's 4,500 employees could be laid off, analysts say. But PaineWebber is expected to add Kidder's 1,100-strong retail brokerage staff. …

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