US Forces in Cuba Accused of Abuse US Military Looks into Charges of Assault and Incarceration at Guantanamo Base

By Jonathan S. Landay, writer of The Christian Science Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, February 16, 1995 | Go to article overview
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US Forces in Cuba Accused of Abuse US Military Looks into Charges of Assault and Incarceration at Guantanamo Base


Jonathan S. Landay, writer of The Christian Science Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


THE US military is investigating allegations that its servicemen abused dozens of Haitian minors confined to a refugee camp at the US Naval Base at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.

"There is an investigation. We haven't heard back yet from the investigators," says Air Force Sgt. Jerold Hawkins, the spokesman for the military contingent overseeing Cuban and Haitian refugees at Guantanamo. "We take charges like that very seriously."

The allegations -- including handcuffing, assaults, and incarceration -- have enraged refugee and human rights groups already angered by the Clinton administration. The White House has refused to admit into the US most of the tens of thousands of Haitians and Cubans taken to Guantanamo last year after being prevented from reaching US shores on boats.

Critics decry the policy as a politically motivated response to growing anti-immigration sentiments in the United States.

After the US-engineered ouster of Haiti's former military regime in October, all but about 4,400 of the 21,000 Haitians sheltered at Guantanamo returned home voluntarily. All but about 780 of the 4,400 have now been forcibly repatriated.

Those remaining include 328 Haitian minors who fled their Caribbean island alone. Their parents were either killed by the former military regime or they were themselves victims of abuse. Two hundred have relatives in the US and many others have sponsors.

But the Clinton administration plans to send them all home once an orphanage is located.

"The thing that concerns me is that many of these children are terrified about returning to Haiti," says Cheryl Little, a lawyer involved in a campaign to have the minors admitted to the US.

The minors' plight, she says, has been worsened by alleged mistreatment meted out by US soldiers who guard their tent camp at Guantanamo. Ms. Little, three other lawyers, a social worker, and a paralegal made two trips to Guantanamo in December and January to obtain background information from the minors.

It was in interviews on the second trip, Little says, that "dozens" of minors began voluntarily disclosing abuse by US soldiers.

"Child after child was complaining about being abused by the soldiers, by the MPs {military police}," says Little of the Florida Rural Legal Services in Miami.

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