Nationality of UN Forces Challenged by Croatia

By David Rohde, writer of The Christian Science Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, March 22, 1995 | Go to article overview

Nationality of UN Forces Challenged by Croatia


David Rohde, writer of The Christian Science Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


IN what could set a precedent for future United Nations peacekeeping operations, Croatia is insisting that it control which UN forces monitor its borders with Serbia and Bosnia.

The unusual demand, which follows Croatia's earlier threat to remove all UN peacekeepers by June 30, could undermine the credibility of UN peacekeeping operations and may even smack of racism, according to senior UN officials here.

"They only want white people guarding their borders," says a senior UN official. "From our point of view, it seems like basic Croatian racism."

UN officials point to a series of unsuccessful requests since January by Croatian President Franjo Tudjman that troops only from NATO nations, then troops only from Western Europe, and finally troops only from the "contact group" -- the United States, Britain, France, Germany, and Russia -- be allowed to stay in Croatia. Most of those nations are predominantly white.

Under a new deal brokered by the US in early March, about half of the 15,000 peacekeepers in Croatia will be allowed to stay and police a tenuous truce between government troops and rebel Serbs. Draft UN Security Council resolutions on the mandate and composition of the new force are being circulated behind closed doors this week at the UN, but Croatian officials insist they control the makeup of that new force.

"We need troops that come from countries that have experience, equipment, and are trained for the new task," Mario Nobilo, Croatia's ambassador to the UN told reporters after a meeting between President Tudjman and UN Secretary General Boutros Boutros-Ghali on March 17.

Western diplomats based in Zagreb caution that UN officials are injecting race where it doesn't belong. But UN officials complain that Croatia wants no new peacekeepers from developing nations and that Kenyan, Nepalese, and Jordanian battalions serving in Croatia should leave.

"The mayor {of the Croatian town} of Osijek has been making some extremely racist statements recently" to UN field workers, the UN official says, "that the Africans and the Asians should be sent to Bosnia."

Very few good men?

Senior Croatian officials say their requests for an all-European or NATO force has nothing to do with race and everything to do with effectiveness. The new, smaller UN force will take on the additional duty of monitoring 25 to 30 border posts to "deter" Croatian Serb military forces from crossing into or being resupplied by Serb-dominated areas in neighboring Bosnia and Serbia.

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