Exhibit Recounts Strivings of Women Reformers

By Adrianne Appel, Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, March 3, 1995 | Go to article overview

Exhibit Recounts Strivings of Women Reformers


Adrianne Appel, Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


THE year was 1918, and Christia Adair, an African-American suffragist, worked tirelessly in Kingsville, Texas, collecting signatures on petitions demanding that women be allowed to vote. She and thousands of other black women across the country thought their work was over when the 19th Amendment was ratified in 1920.

But when Adair attempted to vote in her first primary, she was turned away. Not for another 45 years would black women and men be guaranteed the right to vote under the Voting Rights Act.

Adair is one of hundreds of women activists who have fought for basic rights for American women and society in this century. Twenty-eight of these women are featured in "Women in Action: Rebels and Reformers 1920-1980," a traveling exhibit inspired by this year's 75th anniversary of women's suffrage.

"The exhibit honors many women who left a deep imprint on American political history, but whose accomplishments may not have been recorded in textbooks," says Becky Cain, president of the League of Women Voters, which is sponsoring the show. "Their actions are gestures of faith in people's power to shape history outside of political parties."

The show, which began a tour of 16 cities on Feb. 27, pays particular attention to the contributions of women of color, whose stories are not generally well known. There is Tye Leung Schulze (1888-1972), who aided Chinese-American girls who had been sold into slavery, and Sarah Winnemucca (1844-1891), who fought for native American rights. They are joined by the more familiar historical giants, such as Sojourner Truth (1797-1883), a freed slave who became a black-rights activist, and Elizabeth Cady Stanton (1815-1902), a suffragist and organizer of the first women's rights convention in Seneca Falls, N.Y., in 1848.

The exhibit brings home the point that these women were instrumental in securing advancements in many areas of American society. Their work brought public-health laws, labor laws, equal rights and civil rights, as well as a wider availability of more effective forms of birth control.

The exhibit's vignettes tell many stories of women's struggle and triumph. By 1917, 2 million women had joined the National Women's Suffrage Association -- a forerunner to the League of Women Voters -- under the leadership of the imposing Carrie Chapman Catt. The NWSA was a mainstream group that believed in working through the system.

A second group active at the time, the 60,000-strong National Women's Party (NWP), was more radical and modeled its protests after the English suffragists' movement, picketing and burning speeches of President Woodrow Wilson in front of the White House.

MANY sectors of society were opposed to the suffragists and waged campaigns against them. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Exhibit Recounts Strivings of Women Reformers
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.