Welfare and the Rural Poor President Clinton Attends Summit in Iowa on Poverty in the Countryside

By James L. Tyson, Writer of the Christian Science Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, April 25, 1995 | Go to article overview

Welfare and the Rural Poor President Clinton Attends Summit in Iowa on Poverty in the Countryside


James L. Tyson, Writer of the Christian Science Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


PRESIDENT Clinton today shifts the focus of the national debate on welfare to rural residents who, by some measures, have the distinction of being the poorest of America's poor.

The president, rural leaders, farmers, and social workers gather for the one-day National Rural Conference in Ames, Iowa -- the culmination of a series of conferences organized by the Clinton administration -- to consider how to mobilize technology, schools, tax policy, and government aid to enliven the nation's countryside.

The need here is great and, until now, has received little attention.

The debate over the poor and welfare typically evokes images of single mothers living in urban ghettos and homeless panhandlers in the city parks. But statistics show that poverty rate is highest in rural areas. And improving the situation is made more difficult by a relative lack of publicity and political clout, few job and education opportunities, and underuse of government-aid programs available to the rural needy.

Poverty is not just urban

"We think of poverty as being an urban problem, but in many places the percentages of people in poverty are comparable -- if not greater than -- in non-metro areas," says Jeff Crump, a professor at Western Illinois University in Macomb, Ill.

The United States Census Bureau shows that 17.3 percent of all residents in the countryside live in poverty, compared with 14.6 percent poverty rate among urban residents.

The rural poor are especially relevant to the welfare debate, too, because statistics also show that having a full-time, low-wage job does not ensure adequate food or shelter.

A bigger chunk of the rural poor has jobs than the urban poor. In the countryside, 65 percent of the poor live in families with one or more working members. In the city, 54 percent of the needy live in such families, says Moises Loza, executive director of the Housing Assistance Council in Washington, D.C.

Such figures cast doubt on the many welfare-reform measures that seek to move people from public aid to employment based on the assumption that a job will buoy a worker's family above poverty.

Experts say the Clinton administration should consider helping the rural poor in several ways:

rPublicize the Earned Income Tax Credit. Many citizens in rural areas live far from public-aid officials and do not know they qualify for this credit, which low-income workers can put toward social security taxes. …

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