Renew Nonproliferation Accord to Control Spread of Nuclear Weapons

The Christian Science Monitor, May 11, 1995 | Go to article overview
Save to active project

Renew Nonproliferation Accord to Control Spread of Nuclear Weapons


Renew Nonproliferation Accord to Control Spread Of Nuclear Weapons

The opinion-page article "Nonproliferation: Now a Workable Idea," April 27, failed to underscore an important point: The Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty is supposed to help nations acquire and use nuclear technology for medical and commercial purposes. In exchange for this privilege, the nonnuclear states must forswear the development of or trade in nuclear weapons. And for the 25-year life of the original agreement this has worked very well.

The treaty is significant for the US since we enjoy a growing trade in peaceful nuclear technology with Japan, China, and other countries. It is therefore important for preserving billions of dollars in income for this country and the thousands of jobs that come with it. The nonproliferation accord must be renewed indefinitely because of its critical importance in controlling the spread of nuclear weapons and its role in fostering the use of peaceful nuclear technology. Without the treaty, there will be that much less security in the world and less economic growth.

Theodore M. Besmann, Oak Ridge, Tenn.

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Recalling time spent in Okinawa

I agree with the opinion-page article "Remembering Okinawa," April 3, regarding the motivation of the Japanese military during World War II and the flawed revisionist argument against the dropping of the atomic bombs. To examine some other aspects of the Japanese/Okinawan relationship, this is how I remember Okinawa:

I worked in Okinawa 18 years after the war. In my experiences with the Okinawans, I found they were friendly, outgoing, and not rigid in their thoughts and actions -- even in relation to their religious practices. I saw how the Japanese treated the Okinawans as second-class citizens in both Japan and Okinawa.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited article

Renew Nonproliferation Accord to Control Spread of Nuclear Weapons
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?