Is It Wrong to Be Optimistic about the Environment?

By Knickerbocker, Brad | The Christian Science Monitor, June 13, 1995 | Go to article overview

Is It Wrong to Be Optimistic about the Environment?


Knickerbocker, Brad, The Christian Science Monitor


A public squabble has broken out over a new book, and the result could be a much-needed shaking up of assumptions, attitudes, and prejudices on the environment.

"A Moment on the Earth: The Coming Age of Environmental Optimism," by Gregg Easterbrook, an accomplished magazine writer, covers everything from endangered species to toxic waste and many other issues. And at 743 pages it's a real door-stopper.

But it's also aimed at the general public and by extension government policymakers, which is why professional environmentalists are so upset with it. They are challenging the author in newsletters, press releases, computer forums, and radio debates.

Easterbrook's assertion is that, far from teetering on the brink of ecological disaster, "the Western world today is on the verge of the greatest ecological renewal that humankind has known."

Among the premises he sums up as "ecorealism" are: "That in the Western world pollution will end within our lifetimes.... That most feared environmental catastrophes, such as runaway global warming, are almost certain to be avoided.... That humankind, even a growing human population of many billions, can take a constructive place in the natural order."

William Reilly, Environmental Protection Agency administrator in the Bush administration, calls Easterbrook's work "the most influential book since {Rachel Carson's} 'Silent Spring'." Environmental naysayers say it confirms their argument that most environmentalists are Chicken Littles.

But other experts have probed "A Moment on the Earth" and found it full of holes. Not only that, they say it is dangerous because it lulls people into a false sense that everything is OK.

Leading the criticism is the Environmental Defense Fund, a research and advocacy group that stresses science as the basis of its work. In a lengthy analysis of the book, EDF staff scientists (with the help of some academic experts) pick it apart page by page, concluding that it is "replete with errors and misinterpretations of the scientific evidence. …

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Is It Wrong to Be Optimistic about the Environment?
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