The News in Brief

By Cynthia Hanson, Abraham McLaughlin, and Peter Nordahl | The Christian Science Monitor, August 3, 1995 | Go to article overview

The News in Brief


Cynthia Hanson, Abraham McLaughlin, and Peter Nordahl, The Christian Science Monitor


The US

President Clinton says he will veto the bill to lift the Bosnian arms embargo. But he must now find the votes to avoid an override. Both congressional chambers approved the measure with veto-proof votes: 298 to 128 in the House on Tuesday; 69 to 29 in the Senate last week. Clinton argues that lifting the embargo will prompt allies to withdraw their UN soldiers with help from the US, putting 25,000 US troops in the line of fire. Congressional supporters say Bosnian Muslims need weapons for self-defense against the Serbs.

Two networks. Two deals. Two days. Westinghouse confirmed its $5.4 billion buyout of CBS on Tuesday, the day after Disney announced a $19 billion takeover of Capital-Cities/ABC. The spate of deals could prompt more buyout offers, analysts said, including a higher bid for CBS. (Editorial, Page 20.)

At 3:30 a.m. yesterday, California passed a budget. It was one month late. At the last minute, Governor Wilson dropped his demand for five budget-related bills.

Hurricane Erin dwindled to a tropical storm early yesterday. (Story, Page 4.)

Excerpts from the Unabomber's manifesto appeared yesterday in the New York Times and the Washington Post. The elusive terrorist, who is thought to be responsible for a 17-year string of deadly bombings, has said he will stop the attacks if all of the treatise's 35,000 words are printed. The papers said Tuesday they had not decided whether to print the full text. The FBI meanwhile, contacted many universities - including some in Chicago, Salt Lake City, and northern California - where the Unabomber may have taken history of science classes.

The economy may be gaining momentum again. In its first rise this year, the Index of Leading Indicators - which forecasts economic trends six to nine months ahead - rose 0.2 percent in June, the Commerce Department reported yesterday.

One in five Americans thinks White House Counsel Vincent Foster was murdered. Nearly half think the White House is covering something up, a Time/CNN poll released Tuesday found. FBI, Park Service, and Justice Department officials were to testify yesterday in congressional hearings.

"We have found no major conspiracies," Waco hearings' GOP co-chair, Congressman Zeliff, said after the final day of testimony Tuesday. While Attorney General Reno placed blame for 80 Davidian deaths on leader David Koresh, she admitted about the raid: "I don't know what the right answer was." Democrats say the hearings were fruitless. The GOP says they focused attention on two reckless agencies - the FBI and the ATF.

In the controversial trial of Mumia Abu-Jamal, who is sentenced to die on Aug. 17 in Philadelphia for the 1981 killing of a policeman, a witness said yesterday that he now remembers Abu-Jamal saying "I shot him, I hope he dies." The former police officer says that until recently he didn't think the confession was important. Abu-Jamal, who once reported for the radio from death row, has gained worldwide fame. On Tuesday a group of French writers gathered to protest his execution. Critics say he is the victim of a racist court system. (Story, Page 4.)

The Senate Ethics Committee wants to know whether Senator Simpson obtained secret documents of its investigation of sexual conduct charges against Senator Packwood. Simpson, a Packwood defender, says that one woman who charged Packwood with harassment actually made advances toward him. The Committee wants to know if the basis for Simpson's claim is the committee's secret documents.

The House ethics committee is considering whether to elevate its investigation of Speaker Gingrich's book deal with media tycoon Rupert by hiring an outside counsel. Gingrich and Murdoch testified recently. Democrats are calling for a formal investigation and charge that Republicans are stalling. GOP Chairman Johnson said Tuesday it was time to step back and assess the situation. …

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