Mexico's Unionization Struggle

By Eyal Press. Eyal Press writes on international affairs . | The Christian Science Monitor, August 29, 1995 | Go to article overview
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Mexico's Unionization Struggle


Eyal Press. Eyal Press writes on international affairs ., The Christian Science Monitor


Between March 23 and June 21 of this year, a Mexican affiliate of the American-based Kirkwood Corporation, which produces electrical components for appliancemakers such as Philips, Sunbeam, and Braun, fired roughly three-fifths of its workers at a component plant in Mexico City. The reason? Like more than 100 workers fired last year at G.E. and Honeywell plants in Mexico, and six others discharged at the Sony Corporation's maquiladora facility in Nuevo Laredo, the Kirkwood workers were sacked for trying to organize an independent union - a fundamental right in Mexico's Constitution but routinely denied in the maquiladoras. The absence of strong, independent unions - keeping wages low and workers compliant - is one of the chief attractions for American multinationals that shift their operations to Mexico. Such moves have accelerated since the December 1994 devaluation of the Mexican peso, which slashed labor costs by roughly 50 percent. "The maquiladora industry," says the Ciemex-WEFA economic forecasting group, "will experience a boom in 1995-96.... As many as 160 additional plants will set up operations to take advantage of reduced operating costs." US-affiliated firms take a lead in keeping wages low and workers powerless. "US companies that operate in Mexico," says Ed Feigen, who monitors US multinationals in Mexico for the AFL-CIO, "are on the cutting edge of driving down wages and undermining unions. They're cleaner than sweatshops, but these plants do not pay a livable wage ...." A case in point is the Kirkwood-affiliated plant in Mexico City. Most workers there - as at Sony, G.E., and Honeywell - are women. In late 1994, these women began complaining that the plant's lunchroom and toilets were filthy and that security guards, who frisk employees at the plant's gates, engaged in sexual harassment. The workers hoped to alter these conditions and to stanch the drastic decline in their wages precipitated by the peso devaluation by forming an independent union. Virginia Vallegas Chimal, a Kirkwood worker earning 30 pesos a day - the equivalent of $10 before the devaluation, $5 afterward - explained: "With this salary, it is impossible to live. You're half-fed ... I have to stretch what I earn to make miracles." Ms. Vallegas is no longer getting by.

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