Needed: Stories about the True Purpose of Education

By David K. Nartonis. David K. Nartonis is a former college teacher, school evaluator, and educational planner. | The Christian Science Monitor, September 11, 1995 | Go to article overview

Needed: Stories about the True Purpose of Education


David K. Nartonis. David K. Nartonis is a former college teacher, school evaluator, and educational planner., The Christian Science Monitor


The End of Education

By Neil Postman

Alfred A. Knopf

195 pp., $22

A new book by Neil Postman is like an informed but opinionated editorial in your favorite newspaper. In his latest book, "The End of Education," he returns to the subject he has addressed most often: culture and education.

For Postman, modern society is something like a man who buys a new car and then gets so involved in driving it that he loses sight of where he meant to go. Our car is technology, and in our fascination with technology we have allowed the means to obscure the ends. Education is no exception.

The way to put purpose back into education, Postman says, is for it to fulfill one of the deepest human needs - something to believe in. He spends the better part of his book examining how to bring this "something" into classrooms.

According to Postman: "For school to make sense, the young, their parents, and their teachers must have a god to serve, or, even better, several gods. If they have none, school is pointless." Without something to believe in, learning becomes meaningless - the equivalent of driving around without anywhere to go.

What keeps too many schools from being effective, then, is the lack of a commonly accepted story "that tells of origins and envisions a future, a story that constructs ideals, prescribes rules of conduct, provides a source of authority, and, above all, gives a sense of continuity and purpose."

Sometimes he calls the answer a narrative, by analogy with the Judeo-Christian scripture stories. Alternatively, he invokes a god, by analogy with the "something" that, according to these scriptures, created the universe and gave us moral laws to live by. There are echoes here of the psychologist Rollo May, whose book "The Cry for Myth," Postman quotes.

In addition to describing some of the bad effects of trying to live without something to believe in, Postman lists some of the unsuccessful alternatives to God and the Bible that have been tried in recent times. Nazism, Marxism, science, and technology are all on his list of things that people have tried to make into the narratives and gods they hunger for. …

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