Visiting Manatees and Mermaids

By D. Emogene Gilman | The Christian Science Monitor, September 19, 1995 | Go to article overview

Visiting Manatees and Mermaids


D. Emogene Gilman, The Christian Science Monitor


I awakened feeling I was in a strange place. The room was dark, darker than rooms ever are. Oh. I was in a small motel room. The curtains block out sunshine so weary travelers can sleep. I lay there listening to the slow, regular breathing of my daughter in the next bed. She was still deep in sleep. I listened for the softer breathing of my three granddaughters. I was wide awake, ready to get up. What time was it? I couldn't read my watch in the darkness. No one stirred. I turned over and pulled the blanket over my head and tried to go back to sleep. We were on a break from a long, cold winter in northern Virginia. If April is the cruelest month, February is the longest. In the midst of a snowstorm my daughter said, "Why don't we take the kids and go to Florida for 10 days?" Just the thought of that cheered us. My granddaughter Zoe had wanted to see the manatees that she had been learning about in school. We decided to go visit them. A perfectly sensible reason to go to Florida in February. Although we would spend over half our time driving, the thought of wearing shorts and sunscreen was irresistible. I opened my eyes again and looked around. Everybody still asleep. Nobody stirring. Tiny rays of sun were slipping past the dark curtain, suggesting it must be noon, at least. How could they sleep so long? I turned over and pretended to be asleep. When we reached Homosassa Springs on the Gulf Coast we took a boat to the island pool where the manatees congregate. Injured manatees - frequently hurt by motorboat propellers while they graze in shallow water - are brought here and nursed back to health. They settle in and stay year round. Usually, manatees move into freshwater rivers and pools during winter and return to the ocean in the spring. This ability to change from fresh water to salt water and back is a remarkable adaptation. None of us had ever seen a real manatee. Pictures of the "sea cow" show massive, round creatures, much like a swimming meatloaf. The ancient who confused manatees with mermaids surely had a vivid imagination. While waiting for the gamekeeper to come feed them, we saw our first manatee. Gliding gracefully through the water with imperceptible movement, it swam right to the bank where Zoe was standing. In her eagerness to see, she crowded as close as possible to the bank. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Visiting Manatees and Mermaids
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.