Sweeping Antiterrorism Bill Gains New Ground on Hill but Latest Version Opposed by Two Unlikely Allies: NRA and ACLU

By Robert Marquand, writer of The Christian Science Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, December 12, 1995 | Go to article overview

Sweeping Antiterrorism Bill Gains New Ground on Hill but Latest Version Opposed by Two Unlikely Allies: NRA and ACLU


Robert Marquand, writer of The Christian Science Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


A major antiterrorism bill controversial enough to unite the American Civil Liberties Union and the National Rifle Association in opposition has suddenly resurfaced.

The bill, which could reach a House vote as early as this week, would vastly increase the scope and power of federal law enforcement. It is a new version of antiterrorism legislation proposed after the Oklahoma City bombing last May that killed 168 people and became a litmus test for politicians' concern over national security.

The comprehensive terrorism legislation quickly passed the Senate in June. But it got derailed in the House in October by an unlikely coalition of civil libertarians, Arab Americans, and gun owners who pressed for changes after hearings on Ruby Ridge and Waco raised concerns about reckless decisions and actions by federal law-enforcement agencies.

Of chief concern are the act's sweeping new powers and potential for abuse in the area of privacy and due process. The proposed laws allow for the use of secret evidence in court. They permit US officials to designate groups as terrorist, and, for the first time, prosecute Americans who make donations to charitable organizations associated with those groups. Most controversially, the bill allows for the suspension of habeas corpus - setting a time limit on a prisoner's constitutional right to have his or her case reviewed.

Because of these and other potential civil-liberties abuses, the bill, originally proposed last February by the White House, was thought to be dead in the water. But on Nov. 30, in a skillful political move, House Judiciary Chairman Rep. Henry Hyde (R) of Illinois proposed a new anti- terrorism amendment that addressed some of these concerns.

The new bill eliminates, for example, a proposed expansion of federal authority to conduct wiretaps and provisions allowing the armed services to join forces with state and local police. Both measures troubled legislators devoted to getting the federal government off their constituents' backs.

Most of the original bill, however, remains. "We've got a terrorism bill that substantially expands law enforcement at a time when a lot of people feel federal abuses have gone overboard," says Greg Nojeim of the ACLU, in speaking about the reason NRA officials joined with the liberal group last week. Some 22 freshman lawmakers and more than 20 prominent law professors also signed letters opposing it.

Yet politically, with the Ruby Ridge and Waco hearings now a summer memory, and with major issues like troop deployment to Bosnia and a budget agreement on the plate, the climate may be ripe for slipping the act through.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Sweeping Antiterrorism Bill Gains New Ground on Hill but Latest Version Opposed by Two Unlikely Allies: NRA and ACLU
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.