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'No Nukes in Our Backyard' Stance by Southeast Asia Riles US, China ASEAN DRAWS A LINE

By Tony Gillotte, Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, December 26, 1995 | Go to article overview

'No Nukes in Our Backyard' Stance by Southeast Asia Riles US, China ASEAN DRAWS A LINE


Tony Gillotte, Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


At first glance, the proposal seemed harmless but impressive.

Ten Southeast Asian nations signed a treaty last month prohibiting the use, manufacture, and sale of nuclear weapons in the region. Their nuclear-free zone became the largest ever.

But to the nuclear powers, especially the United States and China, it was a slap in the face.

"It's the equivalent of a family of nonsmokers deciding to ban smoking in their own home," said one Western defense analyst.

The idea has been promoted for two decades by Indonesia, partly as a bargaining tool for Southeast Asia's largest and most populous nation. But the treaty was put on a fast track for approval due to India being suspected of wanting to test nuclear weapons again, while Pakistan may already have operational nuclear weapons. In addition, China and North Korea have embarked on extensive nuclear programs while France has resumed testing weapons virtually in ASEAN's backyard.

The Nuclear Weapons Free Zone treaty (SEANWFZ), which became a reality at the recent ASEAN summit in Bangkok, now faces an uncertain future. ASEAN, once a loose cold-war political alliance now more dedicated to forming an economic grouping, originally included Brunei, Indonesia, Malaysia, the Philippines, Singapore, and Thailand. Vietnam was added this year, and Cambodia, Laos, and Burma are slated for membership.

While many in the region view the nuclear-free treaty as a landmark, the US and China refused to back it at the meeting, citing very specific and technical objections. France was also reported unhappy with it, while Russia and Britain made no comments. "I don't think we realized that ASEAN was fast-tracking the treaty," said a Western diplomat.

A nuclear-free zone is designed to provide a legal barrier to ensure peace and stability in a particular region. The ASEAN treaty also guarantees that nuclear power projects in the region be placed under an international monitoring agency, such as the International Atomic Energy Agency, to prevent them falling into terrorists' hands.

But ASEAN leaders also see the treaty as a way to exert pressure on world nuclear powers to sign a comprehensive nuclear weapons ban treaty in 1996.

Indonesian Foreign Minister Ali Alatas claimed that the treaty framers conferred with the US all along.

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'No Nukes in Our Backyard' Stance by Southeast Asia Riles US, China ASEAN DRAWS A LINE
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