World's Cities Running out of Room Urban Population Rise Threatens to Exacerbate Pollution and Poverty

By George Moffett, writer of The Christian Science Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, March 25, 1996 | Go to article overview

World's Cities Running out of Room Urban Population Rise Threatens to Exacerbate Pollution and Poverty


George Moffett, writer of The Christian Science Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


IN 1950, the Nigerian capital of Lagos had a population of 290,000. It was about as big as Wichita, Kan., is today.

But by 2010, greater Lagos is projected to have a population of 21 million - or nearly 1-1/2 times more than metropolitan New York today.

The case of Lagos is more dramatic than most. But it typifies a growth trend, noted in a report issued last week by the United Nations, that has catapulted dozens of the world's small- and medium-sized urban areas into giant megacities within a human lifetime.

Such sudden growth is one reason the world is expected to cross a significant demographic watershed within the next 10 years: For the first time in human history there will be more people living in urban than in rural areas. It is also the main reason for the dramatic spread of urban poverty, which the World Bank predicts "will become the most significant and politically explosive problem in the next century."

The UN report, titled "The Challenge of Urbanization," profiles 100 cities, ranging from Tokyo-Yokohama - with a population of more than 26 million, the world's largest urban agglomeration - to the tiny Fijian capital of Suva, which has a population of 150,000.

Among other things, the report will be a reference for delegates who will gather in June in Istanbul, Turkey, for the second UN Conference on Human Settlements. "Habitat II," as it is known, will address the problem of finding adequate shelter for urban dwellers and developing sustainable living conditions in what the report calls "an urbanizing world."

Swelling cities

Just how quickly it is urbanizing is suggested by the fact that by 2000, some 3 billion people may be living in urban areas, three-quarters in developing nations. Another billion - or the equivalent of 60 metropolitan New Yorks - could be added by 2025.

New York itself, the city that in 1950 topped the UN's list of the 10 largest cities, may not even make the list by 2025, as it is overtaken by swelling third-world capitals such as Jakarta and Buenos Aires.

It took London 130 years to climb from 1 million to 8 million residents. Mexico City covered the same distance in just 30 years, between 1940 and 1970, and then doubled again within 16 years.

If UN projections hold true, the combined population of the 10 largest cities at the end of the century - 163 million - will equal that of the 26 smallest countries.

The good news, according to the UN report, is that the rate of urban growth in Asia and Latin America has slowed. The bad news is that huge increments of population are still being added each year, and that Africa - the other main region of the developing world - is continuing rapid urbanization. …

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World's Cities Running out of Room Urban Population Rise Threatens to Exacerbate Pollution and Poverty
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