School Reform with a Corporate Twist American Business Leaders Take a Higher-Profile Role in Reshaping the Nation's Education System

By Laurel Shaper Walters, writer of The Christian Science Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, March 26, 1996 | Go to article overview

School Reform with a Corporate Twist American Business Leaders Take a Higher-Profile Role in Reshaping the Nation's Education System


Laurel Shaper Walters, writer of The Christian Science Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


WHEN the nation's governors gather today for an education summit in wooded Palisades, N.Y., there will be more corporate executives in attendance than educators.

Just one teacher has been invited to the conference while all the governors are bringing a corporate representative from their home states.

The presence of more briefcases than grade books underscores the growing involvement of the corporate community in American education.

For businesses, the tighter ties reflect concern about the level of education being provided to future workers. But the governors stand to gain too: They get the involvement of an important constituency - and possible financial support - for whatever education reforms they can agree on.

"It's going to be a different kind of summit," predicts Jack Jennings, director of the Center on National Education Policy in Washington.

State mood swing

At the first summit, held six years ago in Charlottesville, Va., there were more Democratic governors than Republicans. "Now you have 30 Republican governors," Mr. Jennings says, and only six of the 1989 attendees are still in office. "So the mood out in the states has changed."

Some of the corporate leaders expected to attend include the chief executive officers of AT&T, Boeing, Eastman Kodak, and Procter & Gamble.

"Historically, education has been approached singularly by government," says Gov. Bob Miller (D) of Nevada. "It's time that we step aside and realize there is some valuable input to be received from business leaders."

Since the meeting is cosponsored by IBM, the world's largest computermaker, it is not surprising that educational technology is a major focus of the summit. Many of the governors already have committed resources to upgrading technology in schools.

Setting statewide standards for schools - the other main subject - is a bit more complicated. "Without standards, educational reform is like shuffling deck chairs on the Titanic," says Louis Gerstner Jr., the chief executive officer of IBM.

These are not new, unexplored topics, however. "There is already a lot going on out there," concedes Frank Newman, president of the Education Commission of the States, a co-sponsor of the summit.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

School Reform with a Corporate Twist American Business Leaders Take a Higher-Profile Role in Reshaping the Nation's Education System
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.