Plane Downing Fuels Anti-Cuba Sentiment

By George Moffett, writer of The Christian Science Monitor and John Decker | The Christian Science Monitor, February 26, 1996 | Go to article overview

Plane Downing Fuels Anti-Cuba Sentiment


George Moffett, writer of The Christian Science Monitor and John Decker, The Christian Science Monitor


THE downing of two privately owned American aircraft by Cuban military jets is seen as a blow to Cuba-United States relations.

The incident Saturday is likely bolster support in Congress for tighter sanctions against the island nation and has inflamed anti-Castro passions in South Florida just weeks before the state's presidential primary.

The White House is walking a fine line. It is reportedly weighing political retaliation against Cuba but a military reaction appeared to be unlikely.

Until now, the Clinton administration and some business- oriented Republicans have argued that the best way to undermine Cuban President Fidel Castro Ruz is to loosen the 34-year-old trade embargo. There was speculation that if Clinton won a second term, he might slowly move to restore diplomatic relations with Cuba.

But the attack on US citizens is all but certain to swell the ranks of those in Congress seeking to tighten the embargo. Both the Senate and House have passed bills, soon to be reconciled in a conference committee, that would impose economic sanctions on foreign corporations that do business in Cuba.

Clinton has opposed the legislation because, among other things, it imposes a secondary boycott on nations - including close allies like Britain, France, and Canada - that trade with Cuba. His advisers favor taking gradual steps towards normalization in response to economic reforms in Cuba.

But Clinton is reluctant to veto the bill in an election year and thus be seen as being "soft" on Castro. Saturday's incident, combined with reports that Castro has recently arrested dozens of human rights activists, is likely to make it even harder for Clinton to make a case for a veto.

At this writing, the US Coast Guard continued to search the waters off Cuba for the four men in the downed aircraft.

In Miami, Cuban-American conservatives - who have traditionally voted Republican - are planning demonstrations and calling for sanctions or even harsher retaliatory measures.

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