Preventing Teen Drug Abuse

By Rob Portman and Bob Dole. Rob Portman represents Ohio's Second District Kansas is the Senate majority leader. | The Christian Science Monitor, February 27, 1996 | Go to article overview

Preventing Teen Drug Abuse


Rob Portman and Bob Dole. Rob Portman represents Ohio's Second District Kansas is the Senate majority leader., The Christian Science Monitor


IN an era of diminishing federal resources, members of Congress must work creatively to help local organizations and communities - which will inevitably be expected to shoulder increasing responsibility - address pressing social problems. Nowhere is the need more urgent than on the drug-abuse front, where marijuana use is up a staggering 200 percent among 14- to 15-year-olds and 137 percent among 12- to 13-year-olds.

After years of progress in the fight against drug abuse, the numbers suggest a frightening reversal. Apparently our children have come to view drug use as less harmful and more socially acceptable. As a consequence of this increasing drug use at younger and younger ages, our most critical social problems - crime, spiraling health care costs, welfare, domestic violence, teenage pregnancy, and homelessness - are compounded.

According to the chairman of the Partnership for a Drug Free America, James E. Burke, "The country is losing precious, hard-won ground in its effort to curb adolescent drug use. Today's trends are similar to those of the late 1960s, and the outlook for the near future is disturbing."

We believe that real progress can be made only when communities take charge of their own problems. Comprehensive community antidrug coalitions show us what works. The most visible example is the Miami (Fla.) Coalition. Community leaders brought together parents, youths, the media, religious and business leaders, educators, law enforcement officials, health care professionals, and others to craft an effective approach to the problem.

In 1990, Miami had the highest drug- abuse rates of the six major American cities. Four years after the formation of the Miami Coalition, those rates were cut in half, giving Miami the lowest rates of the six. The approach can and should be replicated. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Preventing Teen Drug Abuse
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.