Russian Immigrants Find a Voice in Israel's New Parliament

By John Battersby, writer of The Christian Science Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, May 31, 1996 | Go to article overview

Russian Immigrants Find a Voice in Israel's New Parliament


John Battersby, writer of The Christian Science Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


Azar and Sabina Pekar, a Russian immigrant couple who arrived in Israel in 1990, felt empowered as they went to the polls in Israel's first direct elections Wednesday.

But even in their wildest dreams they did not anticipate that Natan Sharansky's predominantly Russian immigrant party, Israel Be'aliya, would win seven seats in the 120-seat parliament (Knesset).

Mr. Sharansky is now assured of being a kingmaker in the political horse-trading to form a ruling coalition and is virtually assured of a ministerial post in the new Israeli Cabinet.

Like most Russian immigrants, who have never before had a voice in Israel's parliament, the Pekars knew exactly how they were going to vote: for Sharansky's immigrant party in the parliamentary elections and for right-wing Likud leader Binyamin Netanyahu for prime minister.

"It will be the first time in history that we will have our own voice in the Knesset to represent the interests of the new immigrants," says Mr. Pekar as he prepares to leave his modest apartment in the Jerusalem settlement of Gilo.

Labor's love lost

The Pekars are pensioners who have all but given up hope of owning an apartment. They share the collective hurt of Russian immigrants at being stereotyped as thieves and prostitutes in the Israeli media and say that Israeli Prime Minister Shimon Peres's ruling Labor Party has failed to attend to their grievances.

They also reject Mr. Peres's haste in making peace with the Palestinians and Arab neighbors. "I consider Peres to be giving too much territory away to the Arabs," Pekar says, referring to the transfer of the West Bank and Gaza Strip to the Palestinians and plans to hand over the Golan Heights to Syria. …

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