Power of the Buganda: Uganda's Kings Return

By Stefan Lovgren, Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, July 11, 1996 | Go to article overview

Power of the Buganda: Uganda's Kings Return


Stefan Lovgren, Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


While exiled in Britain during Uganda's civil war, Ronald Muwenda Mutebi hopped from job to job. First he was a glass salesman. Then he tried freelance journalism. But when the war ended, he was able to return home to inherit the job he was born into, that of kabaka, ruler of Uganda's Buganda kingdom.

Mr. Mutebi's coronation in 1993 fulfilled a promise made by President Yoweri Museveni to restore Uganda's once-abolished monarchies, albeit with some changes. While the old kingdoms were semiautonomous rivals, constantly competing with the government for power, the new ones were to be constitutional monarchies that concerned themselves only with cultural issues.

However, the Buganda people, the largest of Uganda's four kingdoms, appears to have become a major political force once again. And this resurrection has prompted some people to wonder if African democracies, such as Uganda, can successfully contain traditional institutions under modern political systems. While skeptics say the kingdoms are outdated creations that fuel political instability, others say they are an important part of African history that must be cherished.

"Each Buganda belongs to a clan, and every clan has a strong relationship with the king," says Kabaka Mutebi. "It is a cultural and historical bond that cannot be uprooted."

The kingdoms existed long before Uganda was colonized by the British a century ago. By collaborating with the colonizers, Buganda enhanced its supremacy in relation to the other monarchies. After independence in 1962, Buganda maintained its authority and the kabaka even gained the right to veto federal legislation. This proved too much for Milton Obote's military regime, which abolished all kingdoms in 1966.

Now in exile in Zambia, Mr. Obote played a pivotal role in the May presidential election. In an attempt to win votes in the north, where the former military dictator maintains support, opposition candidate Paul Ssemogerere vowed, if elected, to bring Obote back to Uganda. …

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