Work of 'Twister' Sculptor Takes off Evan Lewis Basks in Newfound Recognition as His Art Appears on the Big Screen

By Kirsten A. Conover, writer of The Christian Science Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, August 15, 1996 | Go to article overview

Work of 'Twister' Sculptor Takes off Evan Lewis Basks in Newfound Recognition as His Art Appears on the Big Screen


Kirsten A. Conover, writer of The Christian Science Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


Sculptor Evan Lewis was in his studio last year when he got an intriguing phone call: A scout who finds artwork for movies was in search of some kinetic wind sculpture.

The film, the movie rep explained, would be about scientists who chase tornadoes.

So, the Chicago artist thought, "Why not?"

He corresponded with Warner Bros. executives, sending them photos and videos of his large, wind-powered sculptures that move and sometimes tingle with the wind. Before long, he found himself working furiously to meet a deadline for works the designers wanted.

One year later, Lewis is getting recognition in a way he could have never predicted. It is perhaps best described in the words of a man who identified Lewis's work at a recent art show in Chattanooga, Tenn.: "Hey, you're the 'Twister' guy!"

" 'Twister' guy" may not exactly be the title Lewis hoped for after more than 10 years as a kinetic sculptor, but for now, the recognition is a welcome windfall.

Lewis's sculptures are featured prominently in the blockbuster movie starring Helen Hunt and Bill Paxton as Jo and Bill Harding. When we meet Jo's Aunt Meg we learn that not only does she make great steak and eggs, but she also creates curious kinetic sculptures.

Lewis says he's pleased when people identify his work by "Twister." "It's very flattering to me. It means I have a style that's recognizable," he said in a phone interview.

To be sure, Lewis is not the first or the only artist to have artworks featured prominently in a motion picture. Painter Paul Deo, for one, is known for having works in "Malcolm X" and "Waiting to Exhale."

But what makes Lewis's situation somewhat unusual is that the designers needed a body of work, not just one or two pieces.

As the artist tells the story, his sculptures were just "under consideration" when director Jan de Bont just happened to be strolling by a viewing room where one of Lewis's videos was playing. "That clinched it," Lewis was told. De Bont chose him, despite hearsay that Steven Spielberg reportedly had someone else in mind.

The next task was deciding what to feature in the movie. The designers asked Lewis for some 20 works, ranging from large-scale sculptures to interior pieces, such as lamps and a mirror.

A few sculptures they asked for were older works that Lewis had either sold or had already scrapped, so he had to start again. "Basically they wanted me to rebuild what no longer existed," Lewis says. One was "V Floater," a large piece measuring eight feet high and 25 feet long made from steel and corrugated, galvanized sheet metal. As rumor has it, that went home with Jan de Bont.

One finished piece had to be rented from the owner in Buffalo, N.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Work of 'Twister' Sculptor Takes off Evan Lewis Basks in Newfound Recognition as His Art Appears on the Big Screen
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.