Syria Keeps Terrorists in Check to Smooth Path to Peace Talks

By Scott Peterson, writer of The Christian Science Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, August 28, 1996 | Go to article overview

Syria Keeps Terrorists in Check to Smooth Path to Peace Talks


Scott Peterson, writer of The Christian Science Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


Though Syria is treading cautiously, it is discretely laying the groundwork - especially on issues of terrorism - for renewed peace talks with Israel.

President Hafez al-Assad has been wary of the peace process with Israel, allowing talks to drag on for five years and calculating that any "peace dividend" promised by Western nations and Israel would be slow to materialize.

Direct negotiations - once reported to be on the verge of a breakthrough - were suspended earlier this year because of elections in Israel. But the new Israeli leader, right-wing Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, has changed Israel's stance and made proposals that are unacceptable to Syria.

Syria seems to be responding with a two-track policy. On the one hand, Syria points to Jordan, which signed a peace treaty with Israel in 1994, as a case in which an Arab nation rushed too fast to embrace an enemy and suffered for it.

On the other hand, extremist antipeace Palestinian groups and others considered in the West to be "terrorist" groups working out of Syria have been told to keep a low profile. At this moment of tension - with terrorism high on the international agenda after the bombing in al-Khobar, Saudi Arabia, and the crash of TWA Flight 800 - Syria does not want to risk irritating the main sponsor of the peace process, the United States.

Bread riots in Jordan last week, sparked by a doubling of prices, were shown extensively on TV in Syria. But the reason for the unrest in Jordan goes beyond the price of bread alone. Widespread poverty is also to blame, coupled with a deep dissatisfaction that the peace dividend with Israel remains unseen. Jordanians were told to expect an improved economy following peace with Israel.

"We point to Jordan and say what they made was 'peace without justice,' " says one Syrian analyst. "We can learn from their mistakes and hold out for a better deal from the Israelis."

"People want peace in their own way," the Syrian analyst adds. "But here they say: 'Slowly, let's do it right.' "

Jordan is the example that "there is no miracle with peace," says a diplomatic source. "{The Syrians} have convinced themselves that the Arab man in the street admires Syria's toughness and does not like what other governments are doing with Israel. …

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Syria Keeps Terrorists in Check to Smooth Path to Peace Talks
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