An All-Expense-Paid Preschool Education GEORGIA EXPERIMENT

By Elizabeth Levitan Spaid, writer of The Christian Science Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, August 29, 1996 | Go to article overview

An All-Expense-Paid Preschool Education GEORGIA EXPERIMENT


Elizabeth Levitan Spaid, writer of The Christian Science Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


Goergia is in the midst of a massive education experiment to help reduce its high- school dropout rate, teen pregnancy, and crime. Its target audience: four year olds.

This year, the state will offer free preschool to more than half its 100,000 four year olds. The idea is that preparing children for education early will help reduce social problems, enhance economic development, and boost the state's own academic standing, which lags behind the rest of the nation.

Begun in 1993 targeting "at-risk" children, the program is being dramatically expanded. A study due out next month shows that participating children are testing higher academically than those who skipped preschool. The program is attracting national attention and, if it continues to show good results, could become a model for other states.

"The movement toward preschool education is terribly important," says George Autry, president of MDC Inc., a research firm in Chapel Hill, N.C. "We in the South have been economic prisoners of a weak education ethic."

Although many states across the country are focusing more on early childhood education, the South has taken the lead. Half of the 600,000 children enrolled in public preschool programs are in 15 Southern states, according to the Southern Regional Education Board in Atlanta.

In addition, in the South since 1990, the number of children in Head Start (the federally funded program for at-risk preschoolers) has increased by 65 percent; enrollment in state-funded preschool programs has more than doubled over the same period.

Behind the move is a realization that the region - whose student achievement has always fallen behind national standards - must make improving education a priority if it hopes to compete in the global workplace.

Across the South, states such as Texas and South Carolina are putting increased emphasis on early childhood education by starting or expanding their own state-funded programs. Most of these programs, however, target only at-risk children who live in poverty or in single-family homes.

But Georgia has gone out on an educational limb and is the only state offering free preschool to four year olds from all backgrounds. Democratic Gov. Zell Miller started the program three years ago, serving 9,000 at-risk four year olds. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

An All-Expense-Paid Preschool Education GEORGIA EXPERIMENT
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.