Christians Wrestle over Ties with Atheist China RENDER TO CEASAR? Series: HONG KONG, July 1, 1997. One of Many in a Series

By Todd Crowell, | The Christian Science Monitor, August 7, 1996 | Go to article overview

Christians Wrestle over Ties with Atheist China RENDER TO CEASAR? Series: HONG KONG, July 1, 1997. One of Many in a Series


Todd Crowell,, The Christian Science Monitor


'The churches in Hong Kong have never experienced so many heavy issues as we have in the past two months," sighs Tso Man King, head of the Hong Kong Christian Council, an umbrella group for the territory's mainline Protestant churches.

He has spent several weeks with colleagues wrestling over whether to accept China's invitation to send church representatives to serve on the Selection Committee, Hong Kong's 400-member body that will choose the first Chinese chief executive later this year.

After considerable soul-searching, the Christian establishment decided that "principled" cooperation in helping form Hong Kong's new administration was the best tactic.

But the decision to cooperate did not sit well with all Christians. Nine Protestant and Roman Catholic groups dissented. They are especially disturbed that the tasks of the Selection Committee include picking the 60 members of the appointed provisional legislature, which will replace the elected one. What Hong Kong needs are fewer people willing to cooperate with the new order and more people "who can monitor and dare to criticize Hong Kong Christians Wrestle Over Future Ties With China

the increasingly powerful civil authorities controlled by a small group of people," declared Kwok Nai Wong of the Christian Institute, one of the nine dissenters.

It is a debate as ancient as the Romans and as up-to-the minute as the fast-approaching handover date, July 1, 1997. How far should Christians go in cooperating with the state? More to the point, how far should Hong Kong's 500,000 Christians cooperate with an officially atheistic government that sometimes views their activities as dangerous to public order?

Adding fuel to the fire was the proposal put forth by some Christians for a special thanksgiving observance this year on Oct. 1, China's National Day. It is a holiday that hasn't been widely observed in Hong Kong, certainly not in the churches. "We don't want to celebrate National Day by shouting 'Long Live Mao Zedong,' " Tso says. "But if it means elevating our national identity, our pride in being Chinese, I don't mind." He notes that Christianity has often been viewed in China as a foreign creed: "Add one Christian and you subtract one patriot."

Proponents say they want to show that Hong Kong people can be Christians and patriotic, too. But opponents note that it will make uncomfortable many church members who were refugees from the Communists. "China didn't start on Oct. 1, 1949," says the Rev. Chu Yui-ming, pastor of the Chaiwan Baptist Church. "This is purely a political holiday; it celebrates the victory of the Chinese Communist Party. …

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