Key Untapped Resource at Many Firms: Skills KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT

By David Mutch, writer of The Christian Science Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, August 8, 1996 | Go to article overview
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Key Untapped Resource at Many Firms: Skills KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT


David Mutch, writer of The Christian Science Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


Every one of the 750 employees of John Hancock Life Insurance Company's information-systems division has a regular homework assignment.

Homework for these computer specialists? It's true. Each John Hancock information-systems employee is responsible, on an ongoing basis, for brushing up on current computer skills and learning new ones.

Skills-enhancement has become so necessary in today's fast-changing business environment that a fresh management process has been developed to speed and organize the effort. And of course there's a buzzword for it: knowledge management.

"Knowledge management is the art of keeping track of and developing all of a firm's intellectual capital," says Marney Peabody, president of SkillView Technologies of Plaistow, N.H., which markets both software and consulting services to implement the process.

She says knowledge management illustrates the contrast between the older machine-production economy and the knowledge-based economy. It's making autos vs. writing software or improving wireless technology, for example.

What's new, she says, is putting responsibility for learning "right on the shoulders of the individuals concerned." The idea of responsibility fits into "much that is new today - employee empowerment, telecommuting, the virtual office, job mobility, and technology." The two most important facets of the process, which is used today mostly at large companies, are knowledge mapping and skills-based management, Ms. Peabody adds.

For a year, John Hancock has been mapping the skills of all of its IT employees - that is, entering in a computer database where specific expertise resides. This allows managers to be more nimble - to let the employees know what their so-called "skills-gaps" are, to quickly find people prepared to do a complex project, and, especially, to boost productivity without increasing costs.

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