Dole's Ethics Charges Carry Few Volts with Voters Series: The 96 Campaign

By Linda Feldmann, writer of The Christian Science Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, October 18, 1996 | Go to article overview

Dole's Ethics Charges Carry Few Volts with Voters Series: The 96 Campaign


Linda Feldmann, writer of The Christian Science Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


Are the phrases "ethical behavior" and "Clinton administration" mutually exclusive?

The Dole campaign would certainly like voters to think so. Maybe their man didn't engage in a concerted personal attack on President Clinton during the final presidential debate Wednesday night - but he still spent a lot of time hammering at alleged White House lapses. With the race for the White House now entering its final sprint, ethics might be Bob Dole's last, best hope for a defining issue.

The Clinton team might well be vulnerable for some of its actions. But overall, judge outside experts, some of Mr. Dole's charges contain an element of exaggeration and there's little evidence that questioning Mr. Clinton's ethics is changing votes. A majority of voters have told pollsters that Clinton's ethics problems - from the long-simmering Whitewater deal to the more recent flap over improper acquisition of FBI files - are not going to dissuade them from reelecting him. It's not that Americans don't care. It's that they've decided other things are more important, such as a strong economy. It also helps that, for many Americans, Clinton comes across as a likable fellow. "If you're personable, you can get away with a lot more," says Henry Kenski, a political scientist at the University of Arizona and a Republican consultant. "Just imagine if Richard Nixon or Lyndon Johnson had wound up with 900 FBI files." But what exactly has Clinton gotten away with? To listen to Dole, who earlier this week launched his most concerted attacks to date on the Clinton White House's ethics, one might think the entire administration is about to be led off in handcuffs. Clinton scandal scorecard Dole cites 32 administration officials under investigation and four independent counsels at work looking at various figures, including the president, his wife, and three cabinet appointees. But so far, no indictments have been issued, at least at the highest levels. In the case of the improper acquisition of FBI files, there has been no evidence that the files were used for political purposes. Still, as the clock winds down on the campaign, Dole has plenty to go on if he decides to hammer away on ethics. Besides Filegate, there was the improper use of the Justice Department in the investigation of the White House Travel Office, which resulted in the firing, indictment, and trial of its chief, Billy Dale, who was later found innocent of financial wrongs. There's Webster Hubbell, a former Justice Department lawyer, jailed in Arkansas for defrauding clients at his old law firm. There's also the question of possible presidential pardons over Whitewater, as felon Susan McDougal sits in jail refusing to talk about Clinton's role in the matter. (Dole's purity on pardons, though, is also now under question, since former special prosecutor Lawrence Walsh revealed that Dole urged pardons for participants in the Iran-contra scandal in the 1980s.) In the history of ethically challenged White Houses, "the Clinton administration ranks toward the top, at least in terms of allegations," says American University historian Allan Lichtman. …

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