Media Become More Faithful to Reporting about Religion

By Elizabeth Levitan Spaid, writer of The Christian Science Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, February 4, 1997 | Go to article overview

Media Become More Faithful to Reporting about Religion


Elizabeth Levitan Spaid, writer of The Christian Science Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


Over the past several years, the Atlanta Journal-Constitution kept getting the same kind of letter. "We're in the middle of the Bible Belt, why don't you cover religion more?" readers asked.

So editors decided to do something about it. Last week, the paper launched "Faith and Values," its first weekly religion section. Instead of one religion writer, the paper now has four.

"Traditionally, we did one {religion} page once a week - usually one story - and that was OK for many years," says religion editor Ron Feinberg. "But in the last several years, ... there seemed to be this increased interest in religion and things spiritual." The Journal-Constitution is not alone. In response to the public's renewed desire to probe spiritual questions, media outlets from newspapers to TV stations are paying more attention to religious issues. The demand for more substantive coverage is also forcing news organizations to reinvent how they approach the subject. Indeed, within the past year, the St. Paul Pioneer Press and the Charlotte Observer added religion sections to their pages. The Arizona Republic is also considering starting one. And this summer, the Public Broadcasting Service, through its New York station WNET, will launch "Religion Newsweekly," the first-of-its-kind weekly news program on religion and ethics. Theologians see several reasons for Americans' renewed spiritual interests, among them: the end of the millennium, which has sparked a tendency to look inward and upward; aging baby boomers who are searching for meaning in their lives; a more pluralistic society that requires understanding of different faiths; and religious conservatives who, some say, have increased awareness of the role of religion in public life. "I don't think we've had anything as widespread and as much of a tidal wave as we have now in this high level of hunger for spirituality," says the Rev. Jimmy Allen, a chaplain in Big Canoe, a community north of Atlanta. "It's broader than it has been, it's probably less focused than it has been in other eras, and therefore it's also deeper in society." Dr. Allen, a consultant in the field of religion and news for the Freedom Forum First Amendment Center at Vanderbilt University in Nashville, says part of the media's focus on religion stems from the 1993 standoff in Waco, Texas, by Branch Davidian leader David Koresh. Editors began to recognize that the key to understanding the event was to cover it as a religion story. "Nobody sent a religion reporter because they didn't recognize it as a religion story, and that became a pondering thing for thoughtful people in journalism leadership," Allen says. At the time of the incident, a Freedom Forum survey found a distrust between the news media and religious leaders. …

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