US-European Ties Emerge from Era of the Big Chill

By Jonathan S. Landay, writer of The Christian Science Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, January 3, 1997 | Go to article overview

US-European Ties Emerge from Era of the Big Chill


Jonathan S. Landay, writer of The Christian Science Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


What a difference some time makes.

Openly divided over how to halt the ethnic mayhem in former Yugoslavia, at odds over a slew of trade issues, and uncertain about the future of NATO, the United States and Europe were sullen allies for much of President Clinton's first term.

But when senior European Union (EU) leaders came to Washington this week for a get-acquainted session with Madeleine Albright, Mr. Clinton's new secretary of state, both sides could take satisfaction in what many agree has been a marked upturn in the world's most powerful economic and defense partnership. "There have been improvements," said Foreign Minister Hans Van Mierlo of Holland, the current president of the 15-nation EU, after he and European Trade Commissioner Leon Brittan met Ms. Albright on Tuesday. "We are trying to be more co-productive then we were before." Simon Serfaty, an authority on US-European relations at the Center for Strategic and International Studies in Washington, attributes the upturn to the success in US-led Balkan peace efforts, agreements on enlarging and reforming NATO, and expanded cooperation in trade and other areas. Furthermore, he says, the US has changed its attitude towards the EU. It now treats relations with the economic bloc with an importance distinct from that it gives individual members. "Washington has acknowledged for the EU an identity that transcends that of its member states," says Dr. Sefarty. "That {identity} acknowledges the totality of the relations, not just trade." This doesn't mean all is rosy. There are deep disagreements over policies toward Cuba, Iran, and Libya. There are lingering trade tiffs and growing EU pique at US heavy-handedness, most recently its veto of a second term for UN Secretary General Boutros Boutros-Ghali. Details of NATO expansion and reform have yet to be settled, while frictions persist between the US and individual EU states, notably France. But overall, the sniping and backbiting that had marred relations are gone. Instead, the US and EU have been working on a broad range of initiatives to promote democracy and international stability, boost cooperation on environmental protection, and aid health and education. They are also working to combat terrorism, drug trafficking, and organized crime. In addition, the sides are pressing efforts to eliminate trade barriers and expand economic flows that already total $1.8 trillion. These include concluding an accord to lift import tariffs on information technologies and market-opening agreements that will allow consumer goods approved by government regulators on one side of the Atlantic to be marketed without further scrutiny on the other.

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