Freedom from Worry Bringing a Spiritual Perspective to Daily Life

The Christian Science Monitor, February 27, 1997 | Go to article overview

Freedom from Worry Bringing a Spiritual Perspective to Daily Life


You can spend the rest of your life worrying, and it won't improve a thing. Worry involves being preoccupied in the present as a result of concern over what might or might not happen in the future.

The world often equates worrying with caring. One argues that he or she proves love for someone by doing an appropriate amount of worrying. But in fact, worry involves ignorance. The one thing that will eliminate it is dominion-the conscious realization that we are endowed with power and authority from God to be masters of earthly experiences.

The book of Genesis in the Bible promises that God gave us dominion over the whole earth (see 1:26). It is one of our rights as children of God. We have always had it and can exercise it and prove it. I speak from experience. Worry was once my regular companion. It limited my potential and prevented me from using my talent. I felt like a victim, nervous and timid. Many opportunities passed me by. I had heard of people being healed by reading a book on Christian Science written by Mary Baker Eddy, Science and Health with Key to the Scriptures. Opening it, I started to learn that the opposite was true of what I had always believed. I wasn't mortal, struggling against forces beyond my control; I was the spiritual likeness of God, with an ongoing, unbreakable relation to Him. I was always under His care. I learned that God is a God of goodness and love; He is my Father and Mother, my best friend. I began to feel loved, and confidence welled up within me as I read on. According to the Bible, Jesus Christ instructed his disciples not even to worry about the basic necessities of life. "Take no thought for your life, what ye shall eat, or what ye shall drink; nor yet for your body, what ye shall put on . . . for your heavenly Father knoweth that ye have need of all these things," he said (Matthew 6:25, 32). Salvation, deliverance from every ill that one might face, is to be found in the present. Christian Science, discovered by Mrs. Eddy, reveals that there are not two states of existence, one material and the other spiritual, both equally real, and between which we swing. …

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