In Praise of Bouillabaisse

By Gladys Montgomery Jones, Science Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, February 27, 1997 | Go to article overview

In Praise of Bouillabaisse


Gladys Montgomery Jones, Science Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


In these dog-sled days of winter, few foods present the palate with a finer promise of warm weather to come than thick, rich soup or stew.

A bouillabaisse, for instance: that sunny-weather dish native to the port city of Marseilles in the south of France.

Because of their fierce reliance on fish peculiar to the area, especially rascasse - the prickly scorpion fish - purists consider a bouillabaisse without it culinary blasphemy. Others (usually beyond Marseilles) say this is nothing less than snobbery. One can argue about this fish or that, but there's little debate that a true bouillabaisse must include the characteristic complexity of flavorings imparted by fennel, saffron, and orange peel. Non-purists - those of us who won't be vacationing on the sunny Riviera this season - can construct a flavorful bouillabaisse from fish available locally. (An excellent adaptation by food doyenne Patricia Wells follows.) Ms. Wells suggests using any of a number of white-fleshed fish including cod, monkfish, striped bass, and grouper. Other recipes combine red snapper, sea bass, haddock, eel, perch, and flounder. Those in a liberal frame of mind (purists need read no further) might add shellfish such as shrimp, scallops, or lobster. Bare in mind that bouillabaisse is a humble fish dish invented on the beaches of Marseilles by fishermen who used mostly trash fish, (there's that ugly rascasse again) considered unsuitable for market. Rather than the traditional spicy-hot rouille, Wells suggests a milder garlic mayonnaise known as aioli - to accompany the bouillabaisse. French bread, mesclun salad, and a simple dessert would round out a satisfying meal redolent of the sea. And, if there is no hot sun in southern France to bask in quite yet, the warming glow of saffron-scented bouillabaisse may be enough to have you humming the Marseillaise. Bouillabaisse with Aioli 3 tablespoons virgin olive oil 1 plump head of garlic, cloves separated and peeled 1 teaspoon fennel seeds Bouquet garni: a generous bunch of parsley, celery leaves, thyme, and bay leaves tied in cheesecloth. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

In Praise of Bouillabaisse
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.