'Value Added' Coltrane CD Ripples with Emotion 'Blue Train' Makes Technological Leap Ahead

By Norman Weinstein, Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, June 13, 1997 | Go to article overview

'Value Added' Coltrane CD Ripples with Emotion 'Blue Train' Makes Technological Leap Ahead


Norman Weinstein, Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


Jazz saxophonist John Coltrane has assumed numerous guises since his death 30 years ago. He is a symbol of "Black Power" to historians of the 1960s, an object of worship for a small cult in San Francisco, and now has entered the computer age through a CD-ROM highlighting his still astonishing music.

"Blue Train," an "enhanced compact disc" (meaning it also works strictly as an audio CD on a CD player), has been recently released by Blue Note Records, and represents a technological giant step forward for jazz music discs.

Priced like a conventional CD, "Blue Train" offers the five tunes which originally appeared on the audio recording, two previously unreleased selections from the recording session, plus a bevy of other surprises. These include a moving video clip of Coltrane playing with trumpeter Miles Davis on a 1959 television special, interviews with various jazz musicians who knew Coltrane, a portfolio of jazz photography, audio selections from various albums where he performed as a sideman, and an internet link to a major jazz site: (www.bluenote.com). "Value added" is the catch phrase heard in the industry for this kind of product, and this disc really does demonstrate considerable value. "Blue Train," even in its original audio-only incarnation, represents a pivotal moment in Coltrane's career. This 1957 recording was the first time in which the saxophonist's own compositions were showcased, and, more significantly, it is the first recording where the full-flowering of his individual sound is actualized. …

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