Clinton Plan to Ban 'Soft Money' May Spark Reform President Aims to Limit Gifts to Parties - and Rescue Democrats from Campaign-Finance Storm

By Warren Richey, writer of The Christian Science Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, June 6, 1997 | Go to article overview

Clinton Plan to Ban 'Soft Money' May Spark Reform President Aims to Limit Gifts to Parties - and Rescue Democrats from Campaign-Finance Storm


Warren Richey, writer of The Christian Science Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


President Clinton's proposal that the Federal Election Commission ban campaign contributions of so-called soft money is unlikely to get off the ground unless the political composition of the commission changes.

But even if it fails, Mr. Clinton's latest campaign-finance reform initiative, which he was set to present to election officials yesterday, could pay short term political dividends for the president and a Democratic Party badly battered in fund-raising scandals.

Clinton challenged Congress in his State of the Union address in January to pass comprehensive campaign-finance reform legislation before July 4. But with that deadline fast approaching, there is no indication on the horizon that enough members of the Republican-controlled Congress are committed to a campaign-finance revamp. By appealing to FEC commissioners to write soft money out of their regulations, Clinton is positioning himself in the reform camp just as the White House and the Democratic Party are about to face hearings next month in Congress over alleged fund-raising abuses during the 1996 election. Analysts say that if history is any guide, the FEC effort will fall short. But, they say, the president can't lose for trying. "Politically it is a wonderful thing to do," says Paul Herrnson, a professor at the University of Maryland and a campaign-finance expert. "{The president} is looking bad in terms of the soft-money issue, and the party is not looking too good. This is a way they can get back on the horse of the reformers again," he says. Renewed hopes Some analysts see the Clinton initiative as a possible means to kick-start stalled reform efforts in Congress. "It is an interesting way to go about trying to change campaign-finance rules. Certainly Congress isn't rushing to it," says Diana Dwyre, a professor and campaign-finance expert at California State University at Chico. "Maybe it will start the ball rolling." Soft money is at the center of the ongoing investigations in Congress and the Justice Department. The White House coffees and the fund-raising of John Huang and other Clinton associates all involve either soliciting or contributing soft money. A request similar to Clinton's is already pending before the commission. It was made last month by three Republican and two Democratic members of Congress. Soft-money donations are those made outside federal contribution limits. For example, corporations and labor unions are barred from making any contributions directly to federal candidates. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Clinton Plan to Ban 'Soft Money' May Spark Reform President Aims to Limit Gifts to Parties - and Rescue Democrats from Campaign-Finance Storm
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.