A Cruise from Seattle to Alaska Via Congress

By Daniel Sneider, writer of The Christian Science Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, May 21, 1997 | Go to article overview

A Cruise from Seattle to Alaska Via Congress


Daniel Sneider, writer of The Christian Science Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


Thinking you might hop on a ship in Seattle for a summer cruise to Alaska? Think again.

Under a 111-year-old law, passengers must fly to Seattle, take a bus to Vancouver, Canada, and then get on the boat. Under that same law, a cruise to Hawaii requires a jog to Ensenada, Mexico.

The Passenger Vessel Services Act (PSA), enacted in 1886 to protect Great Lakes ferries from Canadian competition, won't allow foreign-made or foreign-operated vessels to carry passengers between United States ports. This law, however, is safeguarding an industry that almost no longer exists. Only one American-flag cruise ship still operates in US waters, traveling among the Hawaiian Islands. The large cruise-ship business that has exploded in recent years is almost entirely foreign-operated. Worldwide, the cruise industry has been booming, growing by 50 percent in the past five years, with 85 percent of the passengers from North America. New entrants, such as Disney, are building cruise ships, eager to exploit a new arena for the entertainment business. Ports and tourist-promotion authorities see US cruises as a potential market, particularly for three- to five-day trips. "We are missing out on a lot of tourist revenue for the state of California," says John Koeberer of the California Tourism Commission. "We have wonderful ports of call that are not being used at all.... Millions of dollars and many, many jobs are being left on the table because of this ancient act." A coalition led by ports, travel agents, and tourist-promotion organizations is pushing for amending the PSA to allow foreign cruise ships to navigate more freely in US waters. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

A Cruise from Seattle to Alaska Via Congress
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.