When US Hands over Bases to Panama, It May Leave Environmental Mess Behind

By Jon Mitchell, | The Christian Science Monitor, August 2, 1997 | Go to article overview

When US Hands over Bases to Panama, It May Leave Environmental Mess Behind


Jon Mitchell,, The Christian Science Monitor


Looking at the thick tropical forest cover on one of the main firing ranges of the United States Southern Command in Panama, chemical contamination is not the first thing that comes to mind.

But as the 1999 handover of US military installations nears, questions are being raised as to the nature of the thousands of tests - from combat boots to mustard gas - conducted around the former Canal Zone and the possible effects on health and the environment.

"Just about everything that was used in Vietnam would have been tested in Panama," says Rick Stauber, a former bomb-disposal expert who until recently was one of the top environmental auditors for Department of Defense base-cleanup studies. Mr. Stauber was the technical author of a 1996 Department of Defense report into munitions contamination on present and former US installations in Panama. He says his contract wasn't renewed after he objected to omissions in the final report. Initially, he says, the report was to be a study of all US bases in and outside the former Canal Zone, a five-mile-wide area on both sides of the Panama Canal that will revert from US to Panamanian control in 1999. He says the guidelines were changed, and he was only allowed to study records on the three firing ranges of Balboa West, Pinas, and Empire Range. He describes the Southern Command's cooperation as "less than helpful." The report was handed to the Defense Department in April 1996, but was not turned over to Panama until March 1997. References to usage of chemical weapons were omitted from the final draft, Stauber says. The US denies this. "There were no projectiles {with any chemical substance} fired on any of the ranges," says US Ambassador to Panama William Hughes. Under the terms of the 1977 Torrijos-Carter Panama Canal Treaty, "the US shall be obliged to take all measures to ensure insofar as may be practicable that every hazard to human life, health, and safety is removed." The United Nations Chemical Weapons Convention, which was recently signed by the US, also requires cleanup of any contamination. The issue gained public attention recently when a US Southern Command spokesman told Reuters that depleted-uranium shells and nerve gas had been tested, but not fired, at the US Army Tropic Test Site, a few miles from Panama City. Depleted-uranium testing Stauber says during his investigation he was handed a report, listing all US weapon testing from the 1960s to the early 1990s, that showed that 120mm depleted-uranium projectiles were fired on Empire Range.

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When US Hands over Bases to Panama, It May Leave Environmental Mess Behind
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