Japan Strafed by War Victims 108 Chinese Sue for Damages from Germs Used during World War II

By Takehiko Nomura, Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, August 25, 1997 | Go to article overview

Japan Strafed by War Victims 108 Chinese Sue for Damages from Germs Used during World War II


Takehiko Nomura, Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


The timing couldn't have been worse.

Just weeks before Japanese Prime Minister Ryutaro Hashimoto's Sept. 4-8 visit to China, where memories of Japan's wartime atrocities still rankle, a group of Chinese launched a preemptive strike against Tokyo.

More than 100 Chinese sued the Japanese government last week for damage the Japanese Imperial Army caused with a germ-warfare program from 1940 to 1945. Seeking both an apology and $9.4 million, 108 plaintiffs filed the first case against Japan for its alleged germ-warfare program, known as Unit 731, which is said to have killed tens of thousands of people. A half-century after the end of World War II and Japan's ignominious defeat, Tokyo continues to pay the price for its imperialistic past. Memories of its wartime occupation of many Asian countries linger throughout the region and shape relationships with neighbors-turned-trade partners. But some Japanese hope the prime minister's trip will open the way for Tokyo to admit past wrongs, just as it expressed remorse four years ago to Korean "comfort women," who were used as sex slaves by Japanese soldiers during World War II. "With the world paying attention, it is a great opportunity that a Japanese court tries its own country's germ-warfare case," says Keiichiro Ichinose, a lawyer representing the plaintiffs. Four representatives of the plaintiffs, who say their family members were victims of the induced plague, were present at the court. They have also been invited to town meetings to tell the Japanese audiences of their vivid recollections of what they lived through. He Qisui, one of the plaintiffs, says he witnessed the peaceful life he had built in the port city of Ningbo tumble down after Japanese planes dropped plague-infested wheat grain on Oct. 27, 1940. To eradicate the plague, everything, including 137 houses, was burned down. No house has been built in the area since. Both Japanese and Chinese researchers say the attack claimed more than 100 lives in Ningbo alone. Wang Jingdi, another plaintiff from Chongshan village in Zhejiang Province, says the plague also killed his family members. Mr. Wang started his own investigation in 1966 about what happened in his village in 1942. By talking to older people he learned that Japanese soldiers came to his village and spread plague-infested grain from the air and put germs in water supplies. They also conducted gruesome human experiments on some of the villagers, he said. Researchers say that just before Japan's surrender, Unit 731 unleashed its last experiment in northeastern China, claiming tens of thousands of lives by spreading fleas carrying bubonic plague and setting free thousands of infected rats in 32 villages. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Japan Strafed by War Victims 108 Chinese Sue for Damages from Germs Used during World War II
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.