Foreign Cash in Washington: America's Self-Inflicted Hazard

By Newsom, David D. | The Christian Science Monitor, July 23, 1997 | Go to article overview

Foreign Cash in Washington: America's Self-Inflicted Hazard


Newsom, David D., The Christian Science Monitor


Americans seem surprised to find out that foreign countries and the citizens of those countries have been seeking to send money to influence United States politics - targeting even political parties! The Senate campaign-finance hearings have opened with charges that the government of the Peoples' Republic of China may have tried to contribute to the Democratic National Committee. Efforts to gain testimony from former Department of Commerce official John Huang center on donations from prominent Indonesians and the possible exploitation for business purposes of meetings and photographs with President Clinton. None of this is new. Nations and individuals from every continent have tried over many decades - with varying degrees of success - to buy influence in the US. It is little wonder that foreigners get the impression that money leads to access and influence in the US. The American news media have aired the campaign-financing debate around the world. Americans in substantial numbers have solicited contributions from foreign sources. As resources for education and other institution-building in the US have declined, development officers of universities and think tanks have fanned out across the world seeking donations. Foreigners who expect rewards from gifts in their own countries can hardly be blamed if they see such approaches as opportunities for influence. Neither is it a big jump to assume that amounts contributed directly into the political process can bring results. The decisions that emerge from that process are of tremendous importance to people around the world. They affect economic aid, military sales, trade relations, and often vital political support in international conflicts. The political fate of a nation's leader can be determined by the ability to obtain favors from Washington. Governments, revolutionary groups, and foreign political factions, therefore, spend millions of dollars in the US. Money goes to lobbyists, think tanks, and advocacy groups organized to influence official attitudes and legislation. During the cold war, efforts focused on convincing Washington of the anticommunist credentials of nations and movements in Central America, Asia, and Africa.

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