Marquee Journalists Star in Ethics Debate

By Skip Thurman, writer of The Christian Science Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, July 25, 1997 | Go to article overview
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Marquee Journalists Star in Ethics Debate


Skip Thurman, writer of The Christian Science Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


The Lincoln Memorial isn't the only attraction drawing big crowds in Washington this week. Film crews working on "Deep Impact," a movie about a comet on a collision course with Earth, have halted traffic and packed sidewalks with gawkers eager for a glimpse of Hollywood glamour.

And if they look closely, those with front-row seats may see more than a camera. "Deep Impact" features a news van adorned with the real-life logo of cable news channel MSNBC - per approval of parent firm NBC.

Has journalism become too star-struck? Recently the appearance of more than a dozen Cable News Network journalists in the movie "Contact" launched a debate about the line between news and show business. The movie "Air Force One," which opens today, has the CNN logo in some scenes. (See review, page 12.) If nothing else, this blurring of reporting and fiction raises questions about the marketing of a business that often claims a public trust - and about the proper behavior for professionals whose credibility is their most valuable asset. "It's good for individual journalists and bad for the profession," says Robert Lichter, president of The Center for Media and Public Affairs. "It gradually is draining it of any sense of higher purpose, which journalists are quick to claim for themselves when they talk about their right to know," he says. ABC, CBS, and NBC prohibit news personnel from appearing in motion pictures or TV comedies and dramas. "We don't feel it's wise to create a blurring of the lines," says NBC spokeswoman Julia Moffett. She adds that the policy was always in place but was formalized after an appearance by "Today" show host Katie Couric on "Murphy Brown." But that doesn't necessarily rule out use of movies as marketing tools to create brand identity. Thus NBC allowed "Deep Impact" makers to feature a news van with the MSNBC logo.

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